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 Selmer Series 9
Author: David Garnier ()
Date:   1999-06-23 02:01

Can anyony tell me about the selmer series 9? I was just given one in like new condition. So far it is great. I havent played in about ten years and am having a lot of fun. I know the 9 is an older model not made any more. Where did it fit into the product line? How does it compare to the ten. thks

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: Todd ()
Date:   1999-06-23 05:30

I'm also interested in this question. It was the first wood clarinet I played. I then trashed it playing it outside with the marching band for over 4 years. I recently had it overhauled. It plays a lot different than the R-13 I got to replace it. The left hand joint has been pinned. Also, what does the "T" in front of the serial # mean, if anything?

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: Dee ()
Date:   1999-06-23 12:54

The Selmer Series 9 was a professional level instrument. It preceded the Series 10. As I understand it, the Series 9 was a large bore design in comparison to the current Buffets and Leblancs and so it will have quite different playing characteristics as a result. Large bore and small bore each have their advantages and disadvantages. Today the small bore design is the more popular.

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: ted ()
Date:   1999-06-23 13:09

I believe the Series 9 is cylindrical and the Series 9* is polycylindrical, for what it's worth. I understand it was a top Selmer when introduced.

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: Mark P. ()
Date:   1999-06-23 14:12

THe T is part of the serial number, Selmer clarinets used a letter plus a 4 digit number. A T series is probably from around 1963 or so..... I believe there is a Selmer serial number list here on Sneezy.

I have a 9* that I've played for more than 25 years, excellent instrument.

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: Chuck Kelly ()
Date:   1999-06-25 00:15

Dee, I'm the depressed one (no longer) you repied to. I have a Selmer 1962 centertone large bore. Can you tell me the primary difference a person might experience with the use of a small(er) bore clarinet???
Chuck Kelly

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: Dee ()
Date:   1999-06-25 03:19



Chuck Kelly wrote:
-------------------------------
Dee, I'm the depressed one (no longer) you repied to. I have a Selmer 1962 centertone large bore. Can you tell me the primary difference a person might experience with the use of a small(er) bore clarinet???
Chuck Kelly

-------------------------------

I'm not particularly qualified in this area. However large bore instruments tend to have a bigger, bolder sound, and a bit brighter sound. This tends to make them the preferred choice for jazz. However, they tend to be a little more difficult to play in tune as the makers are more limited in what they can do to establish good tuning. However classical professionals have played (and some still do play) big bore instruments and are able to control them and play beautifully in tune. The smaller bore instruments can have better built in tuning. Plus the natural tone color corresponds more closely to what orchestral and other classical players tend to prefer.

HOWEVER, a really fine player (with perhaps a careful selection of reed and mouthpiece) can sound classical on a big bore horn or get great jazz sounds out of a small bore instrument.

So basically pick what works for you.

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: J. Butler ()
Date:   1999-06-25 03:38

I own three clarinets: R13, Centered Tone (1956), and Balanced Tone (1934) and they all play different. I love the Centered Tone with its big bore sound and playing ease. The BT and R13 are very similar in tone and feel, except the BT does play more freely. I believe the bore is between the R13 and Centered Tone. Your Series 9 is probably more like the CT. I like playing the CT more for solo/jazz/have fun type music and the R13 for section work. My wife has claimed the BT and won't let me play it much. Enjoy and don't sweat the small stuff!
J. Butler

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: Fred McKenzie ()
Date:   1999-06-25 21:05

Dee wrote:
........However, they tend to be a little more difficult to play in tune as the makers are more limited in what they can do to establish good tuning.

Dee-

This is basically the difference between the 9 and the 10, as it was explained to me many years ago. Perhaps something like undercut tone holes make the 10 easier to adjust tuning while playing.

For someone like me with a poor sense of pitch, a 9 that was in tune would be better, since it would be harder to play it "out of tune"!

Fred
<A HREF="http://www.dreamnetstudios.com/music/mmb/index.htm">MMB</A>
<A HREF="http://www.nbbd.com/">NBBD</A>

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 RE: Selmer Series 9
Author: Don Berger ()
Date:   1999-06-27 16:47

You have gotten very good info re: the 9's above. I have a P series 2xxx 1952, no model marking, and recently tried out a P5xxx 1953 marked Centered Tone. They play the same, bold and good, and mine is well in tune [to me]. Cheers, Don


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