Advertising and Web Hosting on Woodwind.Org!

Woodwind.OrgThe Clarinet BBoardThe C4 standard

 
  BBoard Equipment Study Resources Music General    
 
 New Topic  |  Go to Top  |  Go to Topic  |  Search  |  Help/Rules  |  Smileys/Notes  |  Log In   Newer Topic  |  Older Topic 
 Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Ed Lowry 
Date:   2017-12-12 01:48

On all of the recordings I've heard (with the possible exception of a 1959 Warner Brothers Symphony recording), the clarinetist begins the opening smear at about D5. Is there a consensus on what notes to play going up? Chromatic? G major scale? It doesn't matter as long as you get there quickly? These seem to be what I've detected.The piano part I have has 17 notes from the bottom G trill to the top C5.

What is generally done?

Thanks for your thoughts!

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: zhangray4 
Date:   2017-12-12 06:50

I think it doesn't matter what notes you play to get up to the gliss/smear. Chromatic definitely sounds better in my opinion, but you need to be able to do it fast.

-- Ray Zhang

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: brycon 
Date:   2017-12-12 07:01

Most people play a C major scale with a lower-neighbor F# on the bottom. Don't play a G major scale, though: it's the wrong key.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Wes 
Date:   2017-12-12 09:40

Ben Kanter said he played it 27 nights in a row with George Gershwin at the piano in concerts. He told me that he played a chromatic scale in the low register and did the continuous slide in the second register. I've tried to do it the same way in the times I've played it in concert. I recall that he said that a person named Ross Gorman was the first person to perform it for Gershwin.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2017-12-12 23:13

Seems like a no brainer once you see the theory behind this. Music speaks to us. Music are not just notes. Starts with a trilled low G. Chromatic to D, slurred. The speed varies a lot with assorted orchestras. I like to take my time. A slight pause once you hit D.

I do NOT like to play this chromatic scale fast at all. It's a jazz piece, a very fun piece and the tempo never gets going throughout the piece. The whole solo might take 15 to 20 seconds when I've gone this and towards the high C I like to make the audience wait, meaning slow down just a shade and then you finally hit that awaited high C and the audience gets that feeling, "Finally!" Why rush this beautiful solo. Yes you can play by the whole solo in 5 to 7 seconds. But why? It's not as musical that way. Every time I've played it I've played it on the slow side and not once has the conductor ever complained and asked me to speed it up. Every time the orchestra got a standing ovation. This is an all American really fun jazz piece.

I heard David Shifrin have fun with it when he was with the Cleveland Orchestra and I think it was about a 45 second solo. That changed my thinking on how to play this. This was after Szell retired. I don't think Szell would have allowed it! :) I guess Shifrin was maybe 24 years old? 1976 I think. Played it perfectly.


Designer of - Vintage 1940 Cicero Mouthpieces and the La Vecchia mouthpieces


Yamaha Artist 2015




Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Ed Lowry 
Date:   2017-12-12 23:19

Thanks everyone for their thoughts. Very informative!

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: zhangray4 
Date:   2017-12-12 23:32

I think the only reason I do the chromatic fast is because I can't do the gliss from the D to the C super slow. At least not consistently. SO it would be weird if I did a slow chromatic then a fast gliss, catching the audience by surprise LOL  :)

-- Ray Zhang

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Ed Lowry 
Date:   2017-12-13 04:04

Earspasm on youtube has a good demonstration on how to do the smear. I had always had trouble "rolling my fingers up" -- thereby, I thought, shortening the tube incrementally. In the earspasm video, he says the proper method is to pull the fingers off horizontally to the ground. Not intuitively obvious to me, but it works much more consistently when I try it.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2017-12-16 07:22

You kinda have to use a softer reed, drop your jaw, open your throat, and slide your fingers at the same time, starting with sliding your right hand fingers first, so slide them to the G. Practice this a bit. maybe a week. Then slide your left hand, the same way, dropping your jaw, playing flat, and then when you hit the high C make sure you are in tune. Then just put it all together. It is NOT a hard solo.


Designer of - Vintage 1940 Cicero Mouthpieces and the La Vecchia mouthpieces


Yamaha Artist 2015




Post Edited (2017-12-18 04:40)

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: ClarinetRobt 
Date:   2017-12-16 08:22

Amen Bob. I spent years never bothering practicing the gliss. It was something jazzers do...”don’t try it dude,” is what I told myself.
Finally several years ago, a friend ask me if I could play. “Never tried.”
I put my horn together and within in weekend I could play it consistently.

My strategy: throw the rule book out...drop your jaw, relax, open my throat, support like a fiend, and slowly pull your fingers back. Walla...one rhapsody gliss. If I can do it, anyone can.

~Robert L Schwebel
Mthpc: Behn Vintage, Lig: Ishimori, Reed: Aria 4, Legere Euro Signature 3.75, Horns: Uebel Superior, Ridenour Lyrique

Post Edited (2017-12-18 22:43)

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: clarnibass 
Date:   2017-12-16 08:38

Slightly off topic, but I recommend listening to the original, I think the clarinetist is Ross Gorman (not sure about spelling). AFAIK he was the one who first did the glissando and that's why it's done this way (originally written without glissando).

The absurd is, according to a lot of pro classical musicians, playing it like the original is a terrible idea in an audition, for example.

It's by far the best version.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Richie 
Date:   2017-12-16 09:18

Personally I prefer chromatic and that's the way I usually hear in in recordings but I suppose it's up for interpretation.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: DSMUSIC1 
Date:   2017-12-17 08:32

Listen to as many recordings as you can and draw from each.

Don't feel like it has to be played exactly like the original or that you have to play it like one particular person. Make it your own and exercise artistic liberty. Yes there is a general interpretation that most conductors or an audition committee are used to hearing which I think is close to what I have recorded below. I have played it a bunch of times and have recorded it.

Here is a link to me playing it on a 1932 Selmer Metal Clarinet before a rehearsal. Some may like my interpretation..... others will not. A conductor will let you know.

Best,
Dennis Strawley

https://www.facebook.com/tom.puwalski/videos/10212853984477681/



Post Edited (2017-12-17 08:37)

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2017-12-18 04:49

ClarinetRobt - Thanks for the nine comment, yes it's not that hard. Just one hand at a time. It's actually fun. Don't lift your fingers off of the keys, slide them off like you are making a 1/2 fist, but without effort. It's NOT the only piece that has this. There are several, including the end on the Copland Concerto. In my opinion it is a MUST in this concerto.


Designer of - Vintage 1940 Cicero Mouthpieces and the La Vecchia mouthpieces


Yamaha Artist 2015




Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Philip Caron 
Date:   2017-12-18 04:53

Seems to me I've read in older threads here that that gliss should be (or can be) done as a lip gliss, without sliding fingers.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: zhangray4 
Date:   2017-12-18 06:33

For me, Philip, I started out doing the gliss almost completely by the fingers. But now as I've practiced it more and tried to get a smoother gliss, I find that my fingers already finger that high C without my pitch actually hitting the high C. Then I simply lip it up, or adjust my throat a bit, and I go up to the high C.

-- Ray Zhang

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Wes 
Date:   2017-12-18 09:14

Yes, I also played this at the Vermillion SD music museum on a metal, curved bell and neck Buescher clarinet that I have, a rare instrument.

I recall that it was said that Grizez, the famous French clarinetist, played this with the Baltimore orchestra and suffered a heart attack immediately afterward. Can this be verified?

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Rhapsody in blue -- before the gliss
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2017-12-18 21:37

There you go, with just a tad bit of practice it is easy. People are already learning how to do it! It's fun! It's only been a few days!


Designer of - Vintage 1940 Cicero Mouthpieces and the La Vecchia mouthpieces


Yamaha Artist 2015




Reply To Message
 Avail. Forums  |  Threaded View   Newer Topic  |  Older Topic 


 Avail. Forums  |  Need a Login? Register Here 
 User Login
 User Name:
 Password:
 Remember my login:
   
 Forgot Your Password?
Enter your email address or user name below and a new password will be sent to the email address associated with your profile.
Search Woodwind.Org

Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale

The Clarinet Pages
is sponsored by:

For Sale
Put your ads for items you'd like to sell here. Free! Please, no more than two at a time - ads removed after two weeks.

Accessories
Accessories that every clarinetist needs - reed makers and shapers, ligatures, greases, oils, and preservatives ... and more!

Instruments
Retailers and manufacturers of clarinets, both modern and early replica

Reeds
Great reeds available from around the world

Miscellaneous
Services and products too varied to categorize! Repair, recording, news

Service
Instrument repairs, restorations, adjustments, and overhauls.

Mouthpieces & Barrels
Fine makers of mouthpieces and barrels, from wood to crystal to hard rubber and plastic

Events
Major events especially for clarinetists

Music & Books
CDs, Sheet Music, and some of the greatest reference books ever written!

 
     Copyright © Woodwind.Org, Inc. All Rights Reserved    Privacy Policy    Contact charette@woodwind.org