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 Knife sharpening systems
Author: EaubeauHorn 
Date:   2017-05-28 19:08

I still am lousy at knife sharpening despite being shown how by more than one person, watching youtube videos, etc, for quite a while now. Without a sharp knife you know how my attempts at reed making turn out. Gouges and chips.

So....willing to buy a system that will reliably guarantee the sharpness needed for a reed knife. Who has what and how do you like it?

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: Scandinavian 
Date:   2017-05-28 23:11

I use a Stanley Interlock utility knife and just break the blade when it gets dull. Cheap, exact and always sharp.

http://www.stanleyworks.se/products/detail/Handverktyg+_+f%C3%B6rvaring/Knivar+_+blad/Brytbladsknivar/Interlock+Brytbladskniv++-+18+mm

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: EaubeauHorn 
Date:   2017-05-29 01:44

Thanks. Would that be equivalent to this? http://www.stanleytools.com/en-us/products/hand-tools/knives-blades/multi-tool/25mm-dynagrip174-snapoff-knife/10-425

I have often thought that my best bet was just some sort of razor knife but hadn't seen one that appeared it would work in this fine-tuned setting.

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: ckoboe777 
Date:   2017-05-29 02:55

Reed knives aren't meant for cutting, so one could sharpen a knife as sharp as a katana, and it may not work so well for reed making. To be effective, a reed knife needs a burr, or in other words, an almost microscopic bend of metal at the edge of the blade. It's possible to set a burr while sharpening on a stone or a system, but personally I find it a million times easier and faster to set a burr using a honing rod.

I personally use one intended for culinary knives, but it still works fine...

-ckoboe

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: EaubeauHorn 
Date:   2017-05-29 03:18

I have a honing rod. The last person I attempted to learn from had me buy one. He could hand me a sharp knife, I'd run it over the honing rod, and it would then not cut butter. This is why I am looking for a system. I have never in my life felt this dumb about anything, and I'm usually at the "top of the class" at things I attempt. You can put tennis in the same category though...can't follow the ball.

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: ckoboe777 
Date:   2017-05-29 09:24

What type of knife/ cane are you using, and how were you taught to use the honing steel? Perhaps the angling you used whilst using the honing steel was too high or too low... I tend to use a lower angle for knives with thinner blades like Landwell and Herder knives, and a slightly higher angle for "thicker" knives like the Rigotti double hollow ground.

Ckoboe

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: Scandinavian 
Date:   2017-05-29 16:40

I just got fed up with all tools and skills required to just get a sharp knife. A sharp razor type knife works perfectly fine, no need for any oboe specific edge.
For my taste, anyway.

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: Wes 
Date:   2017-05-29 23:42

For years, I've used a Vitry hollow ground knife that is easily sharpened flat on a wet stone by pushing it back and forward about 30 times on both sides. A burr can then be put on the edge by pushing it forward on the stone at about a 45 degree angle a few times. Good luck!

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: huboboe 
Date:   2017-08-23 02:34

If you are still looking for a sharpening fixture, Westwind has a newly designed one that works really well. Email me at the above address and I'll tell you more...

Robert Hubbard
WestwindDoubleReed.com
1-888-579-6020
bob@westwinddoublereed.com

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: EaubeauHorn 
Date:   2017-08-23 20:40

As it turns out, I bought the Weber reed making book. In it was the key to my problem; for some reason one basic concept had always been assumed that I understood, that I did not. I did not realize that one needs to put an "edge on the edge" ... I don't mean a burr. I was trying to bring the knife edge all the way to a point from the very fattest side to the thinnest, with no 20 degree or 30 degree angle on the "very edge." This was clearly stated and pictured in the book, and all the teachers who sat there and watched me did not get that I was not doing it, and in fact erasing the edge they had just put on it themselves when I tried it. Suddenly I was able to easily get a sharp knife. It needs refining, but without that concept (teaching the obvious) I was never going to get anywhere.

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: Barry Vincent 
Date:   2017-08-24 01:57
Attachment:  Knife Sharpening Stone.jpg (41k)

Recently I purchase another knife sharpening stone from China. It is pure white (Aluminium Oxide) and 10.000 grade grit. It's actually a 'wet stone' but I've been using it dry. It is an excellent sharpening stone. Previous I'd been using a dual grit stone (Emery) but I noticed that my knife had started to get a very tiny uneven edge which I assumed was because the grit grade was not fine enough. I'll try and get a photo of my new stone to show here.

Skyfacer

Post Edited (2017-08-24 01:58)

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: mberkowski 
Date:   2017-08-24 06:32

I have more or less the same stone of Chinese manufacture, though mine is glued to a 3000 grit stone on the reverse. I'm skeptical that it is actually 10000 of anything, but it is fine enough to maintain a good edge (when I'm not using my Midwest Musical Imports sharpening steel).

Interesting that you are using it dry. I have not tried that. Do you find it better than wet, or is it just out of convenience that you don't soak it?

The only complaint I have with my stone is that it came with a brand stamped on the fine side in paint, which I had to then grind off with my diamond stone before I could use its full length.

Michael

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 Re: Knife sharpening systems
Author: Barry Vincent 
Date:   2017-08-24 08:22

Hi Micheal. Yes. 10.000 seems to be a large number and this stone is probably less than that. I use it dry only because it's more convenient. It is not a double sided (different grit sizes) stone. It came with a rubber frame on each side for storage. There was no brand stamp on it except of course the 10.000 on one of the sides

Skyfacer

Post Edited (2017-08-24 08:25)

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