Advertising and Web Hosting on Woodwind.Org!

Woodwind.OrgThe Clarinet BBoardThe C4 standard

 
  BBoard Equipment Study Resources Music General    
 
 New Topic  |  Go to Top  |  Go to Topic  |  Search  |  Help/Rules  |  Smileys/Notes  |  Log In   Newer Topic  |  Older Topic 
 G#4 to A4
Author: SecondTry 
Date:   2021-10-08 22:10

In what I admit is only a two page search of dozens of posts here I can't seem to find an answer to this mostly academic question.

I call it "academic" because for the few times that we're called upon to trill from G#4 to A4, I imagine use of the second from top right hand side key on the upper joint, combined with embouchure changes, allows us to approximate how this trill would sound if we, say, ever had a right hand touch piece, that activated the A4 key normally actuated with our left pointer finger, at our disposal to effect this trill.

That said, has any clarinet maker ever, to anyone's knowledge, ever done such a thing?

Like I said, it's just a curiosity thing. :)

Thanks.

(P.S) I suppose in extreme cases, as a sitting player, we could put the instrument between our knees and bring our right pointer up to the A4 key, not unlike, how in far less extreme form, Mr. Williamson does here in the opening solo to Rhapsody in Blue!

https://youtu.be/r4teoC3OnEg?t=29

Reply To Message
 
 Re: G#4 to A4
Author: Philip Caron 
Date:   2021-10-09 01:41

Hi SecondTry. Mr. Williamson seems to be using his rh middle finger to trill G5-G#5, holding the clarinet with his knees to do so.

Why? Why? Why?

Reply To Message
 
 Re: G#4 to A4
Author: SecondTry 
Date:   2021-10-09 05:14

Philip Caron wrote:

> Hi SecondTry. Mr. Williamson seems to be using his rh middle
> finger to trill G5-G#5, holding the clarinet with his knees to
> do so.
>
> Why? Why? Why?


Hi Philip:

I do realize that Mr. Williamson's fingering here is analogous to something I describe, not actual that I describe. Perhaps you realize that I realize that.

Both fingering, that I seek and that Mr. Williamson effects, have in common use of the right hand fingers on customarily left hand keys.

In Mr. Williamson's case I imagine it is because he feels he can turn more trills, faster and more accurately with his right pointer than his left pinky on the C#/G# key.

I actually own, but don't have this installed http://www.sfoxclarinets.com/Accessories.html. The C#/G# touch piece shown on this webpage that is. Maybe he'd like to try one. :)

I could have sworn that before Dan Gilbert was a Backun artist he had one of these on his Buffet for a while. That fact is hidden somewhere in a Youtube video if I can find it.

Speaking of videos, there's one with Ricardo Morales which cites the opening solo to Rhapsody in Blue as what he considers the hardest solo: in part due to the fact that everyone listening knows it, if not for its technical difficulty compared to some others. Perhaps Mr. Williamson just feels that extra level of comfort in the solo using this piece of hardware.

Anyway, back to my question, I figure if clarinet makers can correct the pitch of the low F, that someone, at least at some point in time made a dedicated trill key for that I described in my OP, going from G#4 to A4.

:)

Reply To Message
 
 Re: G#4 to A4
Author: Liquorice 
Date:   2021-10-09 13:44

I have a G5-G#5 touchpiece on a Bb clarinet made for me by Guy Chadash. I never once used it! :-)

Reply To Message
 
 Re: G#4 to A4
Author: John Peacock 
Date:   2021-10-09 16:14

There are times when the G#4 to A4 trill needs to be better than "approximated": a good example is the opening of the 2nd movement of Mahler 7. An effective way to play it is to use the LH thumb on the G# key, leaving the LH index finger free to trill the A key.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: G#4 to A4
Author: Philip Caron 
Date:   2021-10-09 19:35

Using the lh index finger, basically the normal fingering, is an option. It just involves the outermost joint of the finger. Practice would improve control.

Reply To Message
 
 Re: G#4 to A4
Author: SecondTry 
Date:   2021-10-09 20:57

John Peacock wrote:

> There are times when the G#4 to A4 trill needs to be better
> than "approximated": a good example is the opening of the 2nd
> movement of Mahler 7. An effective way to play it is to use the
> LH thumb on the G# key, leaving the LH index finger free to
> trill the A key.


No doubt. The phrase I had in question is short and fast though where there's not only little time to arrange the fingers as you describe, but less need to, given the short duration of the trill.  :)

Reply To Message
 
 Re: G#4 to A4
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2021-10-10 00:34

Some clarinets have a lengthened throat G# touchpiece which can be operated (and held down) by LH finger 2, then the throat A key can be operated with LH1. Should you want to use this, you can always get the throat G# touch lengthened by adding the required length of metal to it, shaping it and having it plated to match the rest of the keywork. It will help to have the stopper placed further down the top joint so it won't end up getting bent through use.

Chris.

Reply To Message
 Avail. Forums  |  Threaded View   Newer Topic  |  Older Topic 


 Avail. Forums  |  Need a Login? Register Here 
 User Login
 User Name:
 Password:
 Remember my login:
   
 Forgot Your Password?
Enter your email address or user name below and a new password will be sent to the email address associated with your profile.
Search Woodwind.Org

Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale

The Clarinet Pages
is sponsored by:

For Sale
Put your ads for items you'd like to sell here. Free! Please, no more than two at a time - ads removed after two weeks.

Service
Instrument repairs, restorations, adjustments, and overhauls.

Miscellaneous
Services and products too varied to categorize! Repair, recording, news

Music & Books
CDs, Sheet Music, and some of the greatest reference books ever written!

Instruments
Retailers and manufacturers of clarinets, both modern and early replica

Reeds
Great reeds available from around the world

Events
Major events especially for clarinetists

Accessories
Accessories that every clarinetist needs - reed makers and shapers, ligatures, greases, oils, and preservatives ... and more!

Mouthpieces & Barrels
Fine makers of mouthpieces and barrels, from wood to crystal to hard rubber and plastic

 
     Copyright © Woodwind.Org, Inc. All Rights Reserved    Privacy Policy    Contact charette@woodwind.org