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 non- sticky pads?
Author: m1964 
Date:   2020-10-27 11:33

Hi,
I have a few sticky pads that I'd like to replace.
The most problematic is the smaller pad under the throat A key, that is moving with the left index finger ring.
Does anyone know if there is any preference between leather or skin pads regarding sticking?
Also, is there a brand that is preferable: Prestini, Lucien Deluxe, Valentino?
I'd rather not use the cork pad there because the open G is too bright already.
Thanks

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Paul Aviles 
Date:   2020-10-27 15:27

In my experience the standard bladder pads are the most susceptible to become "sticky," but any pad will do this. If/when this happens (whatever pad you use) the best solution is to remove the offending key; take a paper towel with some warm water mixed with some Dawn dishwashing liquid and lightly wipe the pad and top of the tone hole. Then lightly wipe dry.


I adamantly put forth (whenever the topic comes up) that the pool of liquid on the floor in front of us when we practice is condensation (which it is).............however, there are small traces of other things such as saliva and its contents that wind up going into a horn and building up over time. You can pass a silk swab under a pad every now and then (or strip of ordinary notebook paper) to keep the pads free of this issue.




.................Paul Aviles



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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: jdbassplayer 
Date:   2020-10-27 16:16

Try Yamaha “powder paper”. One of the best ways I’ve found to fix sticky pads. If you were to replace it I would probably go with cork, it shouldn’t affect the sound by any noticeable amount. All other pads have the potential to get sticky in my experience.

But if the issue is only with the pad covering the G tonehole, it’s probably not the pad. 9 times out of 10 the issue is that there is a depression in the key cork between the thumb ring and the front index finger key that the thumb key is getting caught on. Before replacing the pad just try sanding the cork flat and see if that helps.

-Jdbassplayer

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: kdk 2017
Date:   2020-10-27 16:57

Paul Aviles wrote:

> You can
> pass a silk swab under a pad every now and then (or strip of
> ordinary notebook paper) to keep the pads free of this issue.

Paper money works well, too. The higher the denomination, the more impressive it will look. :)

In all seriousness, this is what I was taught as an older student and it works quite well. And I always have at least one dollar bill in my pocket. The paper (at least for U.S. currency) is very tough with a very smooth surface, so it doesn't get stuck on whatever is on the pad and tear when you pull it out.

Karl

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2020-10-27 21:56

Since you might be replacing a few pads, use a q-tip with water or better, distilled water and clean the holes on the horn. Distilled water is simply the steam from boiled water, so there aren't any bad particles.

Keep changing the q-tips until there isn't anymore color on them. Sticky pads are often caused by dirt and the air you exhale. And yes maybe use synthetic pads.


Designer of - Vintage 1940 Cicero Mouthpieces and the La Vecchia mouthpieces


Yamaha Artist 2015




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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: David Spiegelthal 2017
Date:   2020-10-27 22:18

I've had numerous 'sticky pad' problems over the years, mostly with bass clarinet octave vents and upper joint oboe pads. The solution is CORK pads. Bladder pads are prone to stick, leather pads slightly less so but still prone, and the only synthetic pads I've tried in the past (Valentino and Norbeck) were the worst of all.

Unfortunately good cork pads are rather expensive and are hard to seat properly (the tonehole rim must be completely level and free of nicks or dips); but they work well.

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Steven Ocone 2017
Date:   2020-10-28 03:06

I have to replace many torn skin pads due to the dollar bill method. Valentino pads (and other synthetics) get sticky but are the easiest to clean. I use window cleaner to clean.

Steven Ocone
Ann & Steve's Music

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Arnoldstang 
Date:   2020-10-28 04:23

Try Roo pad?

Freelance woodwind performer

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: m1964 
Date:   2020-10-28 06:33

David Spiegelthal wrote:
"I've had numerous 'sticky pad' problems over the years, mostly with bass clarinet octave vents and upper joint oboe pads. The solution is CORK pads. Bladder pads are prone to stick, leather pads slightly less so but still prone, and the only synthetic pads I've tried in the past (Valentino and Norbeck) were the worst of all.
Unfortunately good cork pads are rather expensive and are hard to seat properly (the tonehole rim must be completely level and free of nicks or dips); but they work well."

Thanks a lot to everyone who replied to my OP.
When it happened, I took the key off and cleaned the pad and the tone hole with alcohol - it looked like the alcohol started taking the white layer off the surface of the Buffet's synthetic pad and revealing some gray spots on the surface of the pad.
And even that the pad is not sticking now, it makes that little sound that tells me it will start sticking again.

I had good experience with cork pads from JLSmith.
The clarinet is practically new (just over one y. o.), so fitting the cork pad would not be a problem.
I was afraid that the cork pad would make open G even brighter than it is now, but I probably could "play" with key opening height.
In any case, I will try the Yamaha paper first before replacing anything.
Thanks

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2020-10-28 20:48

I fit a cork pad to the LH1 ring key as that can be made as thin as you want to allow for maximum venting for a clear open G without the risk of the throat A key clattering against it which is yet another age-old problem on Buffets which they're never likely to address. And besides, resonance fingerings can be used for open G if it's on the bright side as opposed to having to make it brighter if it's stuffy because the pad is too thick limiting the venting.

Chris.

Post Edited (2020-10-28 20:50)

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: m1964 
Date:   2020-10-31 08:32

Chris P wrote:

> I fit a cork pad to the LH1 ring key as that can be made as
> thin as you want to allow for maximum venting for a clear open
> G without the risk of the throat A key clattering against it
> which is yet another age-old problem on Buffets which they're
> never likely to address. And besides, resonance fingerings can
> be used for open G if it's on the bright side as opposed to
> having to make it brighter if it's stuffy because the pad is
> too thick limiting the venting.

Hi Chris,
Thank you for replying to my post.
On my clarinet, the open G is on the bright side already.
In any case, apparently, cleaning the pad and tone hole with alcohol worked (so far).
In case I do need to put a cork pad, would it be a 9mm pad?

Thanks
P.S.
Any suggestions on how to eliminate stuffiness of the C/G# ?
I already put a cork pad, rounded its edges and increased key opening slightly.
It helped but did not eliminate the stuffiness completely.

Thanks again



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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2020-10-31 20:32

8.5mm cork pad will go in no problem in the LH1 ring key pad cup.

As for C#/G#, then the problem is inherent with the design as that's a compromise on the majority of clarinets. Ideally the C#/G# tonehole needs to be where the socket ring is and much larger in diameter for a better quality note, but as most clarinets are divided into separate joints, the C#/G# tonehole has to be placed higher up the top joint and made smaller in diameter to bring it down to pitch and therefore the tone quality suffers as a result (likewise with cor anglais E toneholes as RH3 is positioned higher up the lower joint than it should be).

Some clarinets (mainly German and increasingly some French) have a bush fitted to the C#/G# tonehole to give it more height and also larger in diameter than a regular countersunk one and that's probably why a lot of older French clarinets had a plain C#/G# tonehole and the pad had to conform to the radius of the joint surface to seal it.

B&H 1010 clarinets had a bush fitted to the C#/G# tonehole that intruded into the bore which was also reducing the amount of condensation running into it.

All I can suggest is increase the opening of the C#/G# pad to the point where it's in danger of clattering with the long Bb linkage or the side keys and chances are some filing will have to be done if it does clatter with the side Eb/Bb or F# keys and where the long Bb link is soldered to the LH2 ring key rod.

Chris.

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: kdk 2017
Date:   2020-10-31 21:15

Chris P wrote:

> All I can suggest is increase the opening of the C#/G# pad to
> the point where it's in danger of clattering with the long Bb
> linkage or the side keys and chances are some filing will have
> to be done if it does clatter with the side Eb/Bb or F# keys
> and where the long Bb link is soldered to the LH2 ring key rod.
>
Is undercutting the tone hole not a possible solution, or at least improvement?

Karl

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Paul Aviles 
Date:   2020-11-01 03:14

I'm sure Chris will want to chime in on the undercutting but from what I am to understand, undercutting will cause the pitch to go up. At least that's what I gathered from what I was told at my last visit to my local guy. He adds nail polish to the undercut area of tone holes to lower pitch. This effects the pitch more in the fundamental register than the next higher one.





...............Paul Aviles



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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: kdk 2017
Date:   2020-11-01 03:52

Paul Aviles wrote:

> from what I am to understand, undercutting will cause the pitch
> to go up.

Yes - it's sometimes a worthwhile trade-off. Sometimes C#/G# is a little flat along with being stuffy and you can compromise by bringing the pitch up a little as you free it up by undercutting. It depends on the individual instrument's tuning.

Karl

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Paul Aviles 
Date:   2020-11-01 05:39

I am further to understand that the ideal spot for the C#/G# hole is actually where the ring at the top of the bottom joint is located. This is why a whole body clarinet like the Rossi makes more acoustic sense. Therefore there are compromise design modifications to most C#/G# tone holes to bring the pitch DOWN and in the process fuzzy it up a bit.






...............Paul Aviles



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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: m1964 
Date:   2020-11-01 19:04

Chris P. wrote:
"...All I can suggest is increase the opening of the C#/G# pad to the point where it's in danger of clattering with the long Bb linkage or the side keys and chances are some filing will have to be done if it does clatter with the side Eb/Bb or F# keys and where the long Bb link is soldered to the LH2 ring key rod".

Chris,
Thanks for suggesting. I did lift the key a bit but found that the key travel became longer, and my left pinky did not like the long key travel...so I brought it back down.
Maybe I should have just tried to get used to that key being higher.

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: m1964 
Date:   2020-11-01 19:57

Chris P. wrote:
"...All I can suggest is increase the opening of the C#/G# pad to the point where it's in danger of clattering with the long Bb linkage or the side keys and chances are some filing will have to be done if it does clatter with the side Eb/Bb or F# keys and where the long Bb link is soldered to the LH2 ring key rod".

Chris,
Thanks for suggesting. I did lift the key a bit but found that the key travel became longer, and my left pinky did not like the long key travel...so I brought it back down.
Maybe I should have just tried to get used to that key being higher.



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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: Arnoldstang 
Date:   2020-11-02 03:34

Roo pads for clarinet from Music Medic. These pads are notable for not sticking.

Freelance woodwind performer

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 Re: non- sticky pads?
Author: m1964 
Date:   2020-11-04 17:54

Arnoldstang wrote:

> Roo pads for clarinet from Music Medic. These pads are notable
> for not sticking.
>
Thanks- so far my cleaning with alcohol helped. If the sticking becomes a real problem again, I will remeber about the roo pads.

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