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 Clarinet Salaries
Author: clariknight (---.hsd1.ma.comcast.net - ISP in Provincetown, MA United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 01:19

In a year or so I will be going off to college to get a major in clarinet performance. This decision is rather recent, and I was wondering what kind of pay clarinetists get. I searched around, and (specifically here) all I could find were fairly outdated articles, as I know with inflation and all salaries change quite rapidly. What is the average salary for a clarinetist in any position? What I mean is, what is it for a principal of a first tier all the way down? What is it for an assistant principal? And what could I be looking at for a University? Now, don't get me wrong, I love music and especially the clarinet, and I don't think I'll easily give up the idea of playing professionally, but I really would love to know what I will be looking at in the future.


Thanks in advance, and if there are in fact articles on this that I couldn't find, a point in the right direction would be much appreciated!

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: davidsampson (72.146.59.---)
Date:   2008-08-16 02:24

In a 2004(?) article from the New York Times, the base salary of the New York Phil was listed as ~105k, but it may have changed.

The Huntsville Symphony, pays considerably less, DAVE should be able to tell you that, but the HSO is in a medium sized city.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: GBK (---.dyn.optonline.net - ISP in Southampton, NY United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 02:39

On the other end of the spectrum, the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra recently had an audition for a 3rd clarinet/bass clarinet position.

There were three finalists but no one was chosen.

The starting salary was $18,883.76 (or on a weekly basis - $363 a week)

...GBK

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: bmcgar (---.hsd1.va.comcast.net - ISP in Blacksburg, VA United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 02:54

Other end of the spectrum?

$105K in NYC is not much more than about $19K in New Mexico!

Joke! Joke! (Well, not really.)

B.



Post Edited (2008-08-16 02:56)

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: GBK (---.dyn.optonline.net - ISP in Southampton, NY United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 03:10

Although there are numerous 3rd tier, regional, part time, free lance and pay per service groups, according to the ICSOM, in 2003 there were currently 52 orchestras in the USA which paid a full time salary (living wage), employing approximately 4200 musicians. (about 200 clarinetists)

In 2003, for those 52 orchestras the salary range was from $23,000 to over $300,000 (5 musicians).


...GBK

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: NorbertTheParrot (---.tcl112.dsl.pol.co.uk - ISP in United Kingdom)
Date:   2008-08-16 09:32

Presumably these salaries can be augmented by income from teaching and possibly some freelance work.

Do members of big orchestras like the NYC also get any royalties from the sale of CDs and so on, or does the orchestra keep all of that money?

clariknight - you might also ask, how much would you earn in the military. That seems to be where a lot of people end up.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: redwine (---.hsd1.md.comcast.net - ISP in Edgewater, MD United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 10:41

Hello,

Here's the US military pay chart: http://www.navycs.com/09militarypaychart.html
It's been awhile since I thought about this, but I believe with some college, you'll start out as an E3. If you win a premier band job, you'll start as E6. In addition to those figures, you'll get a food allowance as well as a housing allowance, which varies in amount based on where you work. In my case, I get about double that figure that you see in the chart each month. The food and housing are non-taxable, so that's a benefit too.

Ben Redwine, DMA
owner, RJ Music Group
Lecturer (clarinet) The Catholic University of America
Selmer Paris artist
www.rjmusicgroup.com
www.redwinejazz.com
www.reedwizard.com
www.canyesxilema.com


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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: clariknight (---.hsd1.ma.comcast.net - ISP in Provincetown, MA United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 11:32

GBK-
Do you know perchance how many full time paying orchestras there are in other countries, specifically Europe? I'm pretty good with languages, so this could be a possibility.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: Kevin (---.burl.east.verizon.net - ISP in Burlington, VT United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 12:36

Other end of the spectrum??

Ha. A person will be lucky to be even close to making it to the rear end of ANY spectrum. Yes, 18K is a very lame salary compared to virtually all other fields, but any form of yearly employment is already a stretch to most performers.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: NorbertTheParrot (---.tcl112.dsl.pol.co.uk - ISP in United Kingdom)
Date:   2008-08-16 13:21

clariknight - before pursuing the idea of going to Europe too much further, bear in mind:

- Unless you have a passport from an EU state, you cannot just walk into an EU country and get a job. There is the little matter of immigration restrictions and work permits. See, for example,

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/workingintheuk/tier2/workpermits/workpermitarrangements/sportsandentertainments/classicalmusicians/

- Some countries have national styles of clarinet playing which make it difficult for outsiders to break in. Germany is an excellent example; there are lots of professional orchestras, but these typically require that you play Oehler rather than Boehm. There have been many discussions of this on this BBoard.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: DavidBlumberg (---.hsd1.pa.comcast.net - ISP in Bryn Mawr, PA United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 14:01

Yup, don't think for a second that you can just move to another country to have less competition as that won't work.

Teaching be it at the local University, Recording Royalties from private recordings, touring recitals, etc. all augment the salaries of the players who choose to do so.

Very, very few players go into Clarinet Performance for the money.....

GBK did a posting which certainly applies.

http://test.woodwind.org/clarinet/BBoard/read.html?f=1&i=230336&t=229612


Keep your options open

David Blumberg
http://www.MyTempoMusic.com/skypeclarinetlessons.html
Backun / BG / D'Addario Reed Artist
Philadelphia International Festival Clarinet Faculty

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: Danny Boy (---.dynamic.dsl.as9105.com - ISP in United Kingdom)
Date:   2008-08-16 14:29

Speaking as someone in the European orchestral 'market', the only exact figure I can give you of a salary is the recently advertised City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra principal clarinet job, probably in the UK top ten and probably towards the bottom end of that - £36K

I've been seriously applying for and auditioning for jobs for the past year or so - I've done four auditions (2 for the same job a year apart) in this country and six or so in other European countries.

Bearing in mind I apply for just about anything that comes up in Europe (save for countries where security concerns me or I have absolutely NO grasp of the language) you get an idea of how often positions are becoming available.

I made the second round on all except 2 auditions, was added to the extra list of or offered freelance work with two orchestras and trialled for a position with one. Each position has had at least two full days worth of auditionees at around ten minutes a piece - say 60-80 auditionees. That's after they'd already weeded several out through the application process itself.

It's a long, and in some cases demoralising slog. I know that there are MANY players far better than me in many ways, that everyone has their own strengths and there are plenty of players who I can probably play better than - but have to remember that there is always some better than you.

Comparing the US job market and the European one - they're both ultra competitive and extremely lean.

You have to be 100% sure you want to do this and be prepared for plenty of bumps along the way.

That being said - I earn a good salary for my age through freelance work and lots of teaching, both in schools and privately.



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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: skygardener (---.ppp-bb.dion.ne.jp - ISP in Tokyo, 40 Japan)
Date:   2008-08-16 14:53

For what it's worth to throw in...
I am not in an orchestra but here's what I know about the money scene here.
The orchestra jobs in Japan (for someone in their mid-late 20s) pay from about (in USD) $27,000 including 2 yearly bonuses (which you always get no matter what). This is the standard low end (from what I know), but most orchestras are about this. The highest is NHK which has a very good pay on a par with a top tier US orchestra.
The pay is generally a fixed incremental scale based on one's age OR time in the orchestra, depending on the orchestra. You will invariably get a raise every year.
As far as the cost of living, I would say that if you know how to live frugally, you can have about $200-300 leftover after your living expenses (from the above figure).
As far as the work, most Japanese orchestras do more than double the programs of American orchestras. Many players have only 1 day off every 2-3 weeks. Everyday is either rehearsal or concert. I know people that do 3 concerts/week and every concert has a totally different program. That can be anywhere from 6 big works to 9-10 small works/week.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: William (---.dhcp.mdsn.wi.charter.com - ISP in Oregon, WI United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 15:08

My "end of the spectrum" pay for playing clarinet with the Beloit/Janesville Symphony Orchestra (a regional orchestra in southern Wi, USA) is--by contract--a "confidential" salary of $32.00 per service, for which I drive 85 miles one-way to perform. We perform six concerts series per season "employing" 70 to as much as 95 musicians per concert depending on the repretoir. And even with that low "salary" per service, there is a moderate list of clarinetists who are waiting for me to retire. "What kind of pay do clarinetists get?" My answer, anything you are lucky enough to get. There is no guarantee that you will even get to sit in my chair anytime soon--and I occupy a lot of other "chairs" here in my midwestern "neck of the woods" :>)

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: clariknight (---.hsd1.ma.comcast.net - ISP in Provincetown, MA United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 16:39

I'm not saying I think I can just walk into another country and get a job in an orchestral position. But, it does leave more possibilities open. Like, for instance, there's an opening for an orchestra in, say France, but none here at that time. I'd be willing to go through the work of getting the necessary visa and work permits just for a shot at an audition. Just a though though, and I don't plan on dropping everything just to try out the European scene.

Thanks once again for the help!

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: Jack Kissinger (---.dsl.stlsmo.swbell.net - ISP in Saint Louis, MO United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 18:28

Here is a link to ICSOM that shows all but a couple of their members' current union agreements:

http://www.icsom.org/settlement.html

Note that season lengths range from 10 weeks for the Grant Park Orchestra to 52 weeks for most of the majors. Average weekly salaries are generally above $850-$900 though the Virginia Symphony was considerably lower.

For ballpark comparisons, I think there are two ways to view this information. On the one hand, if you are budgeting to determine how you are going to meet your living expenses, the annual total is, IMO, the relevant number. On the other hand, if you are evaluating an orchestra on how generously it pays for services rendered, a weekly rate (based on the number of weeks in the actual season -- not 52 weeks as Glenn is inclined to use) is, again IMO, the relevant number. Orchestras with less than 50 - 52 week seasons offer their members (whether they want it or not) more free time. How the members choose to fill that time (private lessons, part-time faculty positions at local colleges/universities/conservatories, installing commodes [a particular interest of Gene Kavadlo, principal clarinetist of the Charlotte Symphony!], time with family and friends) determines their degree of financial and personal fulfillment.

Note that the number of these positions is extremely limited.

College teaching positions tend to fall into two categories: (1) non-tenure track, usually part-time teaching positions that are generally very low-paying but can provide some supplemental income, (2) full-time tenure track positions. The latter often require a Ph.D. I don't know how many of the latter positions are available but I suspect, at least with regard to instrumental instruction, the number of full-time positions is relatively small -- limited to schools with very large music programs. If one can direct music ensembles or teach classes in music appreciation, theory, jazz studies, electronics lab or world music, the chances of landing a full-time position increase considerably. (A least if the schools I'm familiar with are any indication.) Searching for "Assistant Professor Music" (without the quotes) at this site:

http://swz.salary.com/

will give you a feel for current college/university salaries. The median appears to be around $50,000 but the data includes experienced faculty as well as rookies. My guess would be that a new Ph.D. from a good university
could probably expect a starting salary around $45,000. Remember, though, that this is normally for a 9-month contract and the number doesn't include the value of benefits, which can be significant.

For information regarding K-12 teaching salaries, look at:

http://www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm

Finally, trying to figure out your expected earnings from a music career by looking at a 9-to-5 salary will probably be misleading. Most of the successful musicians I know don't rely on a single source of income. If they have a "regular" teaching position or performance gig, they supplement their income by playing freelance gigs (shows, weddings, bar mitzvahs, bars) giving lessons, writing teaching materials, doing repair work, making mouthpieces, etc., etc., etc. (I don't personally know anyone currently installing commodes, though. :) )

Best regards,
jnk

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: jparrette (---.hvc.res.rr.com - ISP in NY United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 18:45

I have been a member of the US Military Academy Band at West Point for the past 21 years. The US Army is the country's largest employer of musicians, and certainly the largest employer of clarinetists. My section employs 11 musicians, and below are the pay and benefits as listed on our website (www.usma.edu/band). These figures are typical of any military special band.

- Initial rank of Staff Sergeant (E-6), annual salary of $45,569 without dependents to $51,224 with dependents

- Full Military Benefits (medical, dental, retirement plan)

-30 Days Paid Vacation Yearly

- College Loan Repayment Plan up to $65,000 and tuition assistance

At the age of 43, my pay, including tax-free housing and food allowances and benefits is approaching $100,000 per year, and I am already qualified for a retirement pension.

If you have any other questions regarding military music employment, feel free to ask.

John Parrette

CLARION MUSICAL SERVICES
www.clarionmusical.com
john@clarionmusical.com
914-805-3388

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: GBK (---.dyn.optonline.net - ISP in Southampton, NY United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 19:17

Although extremely competitive and difficult to land a public school teaching job, the salary of teachers in affluent areas, such as Long Island, NY are very enticing.

Speaking from experience, the average Long Island public school teacher is currently making in excess of $80,000 per school year, and it is VERY COMMON to find teachers with 20+ years of experience making well in excess of $100,000.

And just to make Jack happy, it is based on a 10 month school year. [wink]

Of course, teaching in an affluent area has its relatively high cost of living..GBK

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: clariknight (---.hsd1.ma.comcast.net - ISP in Provincetown, MA United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 19:35

jparette
Wow. That sounds almost perfectly ideal. So ideal in fact, I wonder how hard it is to get in? Well, I guess it can't be any harder than a spot in a first tier orchestra. I do have a question though: from what I remember from attending a performance by the navy band in Annapolis, they are permanent musicians who can never be called upon for active duty. Does this still hold true for the band at Westpoint? Or am I completely wrong altogether?

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: redwine (---.hsd1.md.comcast.net - ISP in Edgewater, MD United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 19:54

Hello,

I'm in that Navy Band in Annapolis of which you speak. We are permanent duty musicians, yet we are also serving in active duty, so technically, we can be called for any duty required by the military. By the way, John Parrette and I have essentially the same job, just in a different colored suit (hello, John), although the Army does have better educational benefits than the Navy. As far as combat duty is concerned, I like to tell everyone that if I (a musician in a premier US military band) is called to combat duty, while it is possible, then we (the citizens of the US) are in very deep trouble. Not because we couldn't or wouldn't fight well, but I guarantee that the military would draft young people to fight before resorting to the somewhat "over-the-hill" musicians in the bands.

Ben Redwine, DMA
owner, RJ Music Group
Lecturer (clarinet) The Catholic University of America
Selmer Paris artist
www.rjmusicgroup.com
www.redwinejazz.com
www.reedwizard.com
www.canyesxilema.com


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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: clariknight (---.hsd1.ma.comcast.net - ISP in Provincetown, MA United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 22:18

David-
I was reading that post you mentioned earlier on. Very saddening, but also enlightening. It is why I decided to formulate my own patented four step plan to becoming a wealthy musician. I do believe it is the only hope for a solid musical future.

Step 1: Find a pretty young rich girl.

Step 2: Serenade her with your brilliant musical talent.

Step 3: Marry her.

Step 4 (Entirely Optional based on attachment after 5-7 yrs.): Divorce. End up with half of her 2 million dollar trust fund.

Disclaimer: Don't actually try this. Unless, of course, you really want to...

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: jparrette (---.hvc.res.rr.com - ISP in NY United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 22:37

Hi Ben-I hope all is well!

What Ben stated is absolutely right. My band is well over 200 years old, and has never been called into combat. Our leaders in Washington know that we're not trained for it, and that's not our purpose. The main missions of military bands are musical support for soldiers (or in West Point's case Cadets), and public relations for the civilian community.

As far as the competitiveness of the audition process, for our last several openings, we've averaged 20 applications, invited 5 or 6 candidates, and always hired a winner. These are VERY good players, and generally all of the invited candidates are qualified for the job. Let's compare that to how many qualified applicants are going for a top-5 orchestra job. The idea of winning one of those spots is incomprehensible to 99% of us. What I am trying to say is that winning a spot in a top military band is an achievable goal to any aspiring player.

John Parrette

CLARION MUSICAL SERVICES
www.clarionmusical.com
john@clarionmusical.com
914-805-3388

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: Katrina (---.mpls.qwest.net - ISP in Minneapolis, MN United States)
Date:   2008-08-16 22:56

And you have to be able to meet the acceptance standards of the services in order to play in a service band. I was diagnosed with type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes just 2 weeks before my senior recital. I certainly would have looked into auditioning for the service bands before that point.

Keep all your options open, regardless of your college major and career plans. Plans need to be flexible for sudden change...

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: jparrette (---.hvc.res.rr.com - ISP in NY United States)
Date:   2008-08-17 00:02

A good point.

In some cases, my band included, the live audition trip is paid for by the government. Candidates must first pass a physical exam and pass the ASVAB test to pre-qualify for enlistment before the audition.

If your SAT score was higher than your shoe size, you can pass the ASVAB.

John

John Parrette

CLARION MUSICAL SERVICES
www.clarionmusical.com
john@clarionmusical.com
914-805-3388

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: William (---.dhcp.mdsn.wi.charter.com - ISP in Oregon, WI United States)
Date:   2008-08-17 17:09

"In a year or so I will be going off to college to get a major in clarinet performance." Following, a story........

A local clarinetist from Madison went off to college to become a clarinet major, studied with the likes of the legendary Bonade, went to Paris on a Rhodes scolarship to study, returned and joined Washington's US Army Band where he played Eb, and after all of that......gave up playing the clarinet, came back home to Madison and went into the music store business his father had started years before. He is now owns one of the largest "Music Malls" in Wisconsin and lives in a comfortable--if not, luxurious residence on our cities affluent West Side.

Have you fully considered ALL of your career choice options..........



Post Edited (2008-08-17 17:10)

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: Ed Palanker (---.proxy.aol.com - ISP in United States)
Date:   2008-08-17 18:10

There is an organization called ICSOM, International Conference of Symphony & Opera Musicians. It includes almost all the 1st, 2nd and 3rd tier orchestras in the USA, no regional or part time. There are 50 total ranging from orchestras like Louisville, 31 weeks at $825 minimum in 07 to the Chicago symphony, 52 weeks at $2.085 in 07. Here in Baltimore, in the middle, 52 weeks at $1400 in 07. There are about 18-20 full time orchestras in the USA, that is 52 week contracts which include anywhere from 7 to 10 weeks paid vacation and benefits. Remember, that’s scale, players can negotiate their salaries and traditionally principles can get anywhere from %25 to perhaps double scale in some rare cases if they are in demand enough. Generally, but not necessarily, the bass clarinet player is considered a solo player and can demand a higher salary so can the associate principal especially if they are playing Eb too. Of course this also depends on longevity. Most of the big orchestras have extra pay for seniority. This is one of the reasons I encourage my students to learn bass clarinet and Eb clarinet as I did. The big orchestras usually carry four with the assistant or associate (higher pay and more responsibility) playing Eb. In the mid size orchestras it’s usually three with the 2nd playing Eb and either the bass clarinetist being the assistant first or the second player is and the bass player is alternate 2nd. In the smaller orchestra’s they only carry two and pick up players as needed. It helps here too if the second plays Eb and or bass. That was my first job in Halifax NS Canada, I played second, Eb or bass as needed and alternated on first once in a while when the piece was for chamber orchestra and only required one player. We do get paid extra for recordings and broadcasts as well as a payment from the union each year based on how many recordings you did over the last few years. Many of us that enjoy teaching do that as well to supplement our income so a person can make a comfortable living in they are in one of the top 20-30 orchestras. The others have to do more to supplement their income. Many have to take a second full time job. ESP
www.peabody.jhu.edu/457 A little Mozart!

ESP eddiesclarinet.com

Post Edited (2008-08-18 02:33)

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: DavidBlumberg (---.hsd1.pa.comcast.net - ISP in Bryn Mawr, PA United States)
Date:   2008-08-17 19:29

" A person will be lucky to be even close to making it to the rear end of ANY spectrum. Yes, 18K is a very lame salary compared to virtually all other fields, but any form of yearly employment is already a stretch to most performers."

--------------------------------------------


18K is pretty much Gas Money........ jeez


A major league conductor makes more than that for just one Concert.

But still there is intense competition even for a position that pays under $20k. Unfortunate but certainly true - and the players doing them are very good still. Supplemental income would be the norm there.

David Blumberg
http://www.MyTempoMusic.com/skypeclarinetlessons.html
Backun / BG / D'Addario Reed Artist
Philadelphia International Festival Clarinet Faculty

Post Edited (2008-08-17 20:28)

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: William (---.dhcp.mdsn.wi.charter.com - ISP in Oregon, WI United States)
Date:   2008-08-17 21:58

Ed said, "........encourage my students to learn bass clarinet and Eb clarinet........"

Great advice--and I would add saxophone (sop, alto tenor & bari) and flute as well. Veratility has its financial rewards, especially if the "clarinetist" is also able to play those theatre ww doubling gigs.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: skygardener (---.ppp-bb.dion.ne.jp - ISP in Tokyo, 40 Japan)
Date:   2008-08-18 01:54

clariknight wrote- "Step 1: Find a pretty young rich girl.

Step 2: Serenade her with your brilliant musical talent.

Step 3: Marry her.

Step 4 (Entirely Optional based on attachment after 5-7 yrs.): Divorce. End up with half of her 2 million dollar trust fund.

Disclaimer: Don't actually try this. Unless, of course, you really want to..."

Did anyone else see "Kiss Me, Kate!"?

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: clariknight (---.hsd1.ma.comcast.net - ISP in Provincetown, MA United States)
Date:   2008-08-18 01:58

skygardener wrote:

> clariknight wrote- "Step 1: Find a pretty young rich girl.
>
> Step 2: Serenade her with your brilliant musical talent.
>
> Step 3: Marry her.
>
> Step 4 (Entirely Optional based on attachment after 5-7 yrs.):
> Divorce. End up with half of her 2 million dollar trust fund.
>
> Disclaimer: Don't actually try this. Unless, of course, you
> really want to..."
>
> Did anyone else see "Kiss Me, Kate!"?

No, but maybe I should check it out to get some tips?

Reply To Message
 
 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: redwine (---.hsd1.md.comcast.net - ISP in Edgewater, MD United States)
Date:   2008-08-18 02:29

Hello John,

All is indeed well. The Naval Academy does not pay for travel for auditionees. The Army definitely has more money and uses it more wisely, in my opinion.

Our auditionee numbers are similar to West Point, and with each audition, the caliber of player seems to get better and better. This is good! I think it's because of the economy and the folding of orchestras. People are deciding to take military auditions more than in the past (my theory). The career is very good, with great benefits. In 6 years, someone can take my chair!

Ben Redwine, DMA
owner, RJ Music Group
Lecturer (clarinet) The Catholic University of America
Selmer Paris artist
www.rjmusicgroup.com
www.redwinejazz.com
www.reedwizard.com
www.canyesxilema.com


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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: MichaelR (170.135.241.---)
Date:   2008-08-18 16:22

clariknight - if you're going with the rich girl marriage route, learn about investment management so you can control the trust fund slice you end up with, hope she never finds this thread through Google, and aim higher! 1 Million just isn't enough.

Military Guys (Ben, John, others) by retirement are you all referring to 20 years of service? (clariknight, pay attention here....) Or has the military extended retirement eligibility out to 25 years or further? mid-40s "retirement" from the military seems like a wonderful thing. As a musician I would think you'd be able to go on from there to get a symphony position if desired.

--
Michael of Portland, OR
Be Appropriate and Follow Your Curiosity

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: redwine (---.hsd1.md.comcast.net - ISP in Edgewater, MD United States)
Date:   2008-08-18 18:25

Hello,

I'll retire in 6 years with 20 years of service. With promotions, you can serve as many as 30 years, each additional year adding more percentage of retirement pay. I would consider staying longer, except that the military band job makes it difficult to travel except during designated times. I really should be attending all the conventions I can for my business, as it is now, I'm only going to about 1/4 of the ones I should be going to. I will be 44 when I retire.

Ben Redwine, DMA
owner, RJ Music Group
Lecturer (clarinet) The Catholic University of America
Selmer Paris artist
www.rjmusicgroup.com
www.redwinejazz.com
www.reedwizard.com
www.canyesxilema.com


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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: MichaelR (170.135.241.---)
Date:   2008-08-19 17:20

clariknight wrote:
> Step 1: Find a pretty young rich girl.
> Step 2: Serenade her with your brilliant musical talent.
> Step 3: Marry her.
> Step 4 (Entirely Optional based on attachment after 5-7 yrs.):
> Divorce. End up with half of her 2 million dollar trust fund.

Alternate plan:

Step 1: Hone house keeping and management skills
Step 2: Refine child care skills
Step 3: Find compatible, agreeable career minded girl
Step 4: Become house husband, hope kids leave you enough energy to pursue music

Hey! Quit laughing. It worked for a jazz guitarist I knew.

--
Michael of Portland, OR
Be Appropriate and Follow Your Curiosity

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: NorbertTheParrot (---.tcl112.dsl.pol.co.uk - ISP in United Kingdom)
Date:   2008-08-19 20:14

Ben R wrote:

"I really should be attending all the conventions I can for my business"

I'm amazed that you are allowed to run a business while serving in the military.

In my experience, most civilian employers get very upset if an employee runs a business in his spare time, most of all if it is in any way related to his day job. Maybe music is a special case.

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: sdr (---.bstnma.east.verizon.net - ISP in Waltham, MA United States)
Date:   2008-08-21 22:39

If you're going to be under-paid, there's a lot to be said for doing it in a country with universal healthcare. NOT our US of A!

-sdr

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: jparrette (---.hvc.res.rr.com - ISP in NY United States)
Date:   2008-08-22 01:37

My band is extremely tolerant of extra-curricular business activities, as long as they don't conflict with our work schedule. Certainly my section has benefited from my repair experience, as I'm sure Ben's section has benefited from his mouthpiece expertise.

Shall we start a universal health care thread? :^)

John Parrette

CLARION MUSICAL SERVICES
www.clarionmusical.com
john@clarionmusical.com
914-805-3388

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 Re: Clarinet Salaries
Author: brsmith (---.hsd1.in.comcast.net - ISP in Middletown, CT United States)
Date:   2008-08-22 14:54

I looked at salaries for college professors at our state universities the other day. They ranged from $41,000 to 89,000 for a 10 month contract.

brsmithjparrette wrote:

> My band is extremely tolerant of extra-curricular business
> activities, as long as they don't conflict with our work
> schedule. Certainly my section has benefited from my repair
> experience, as I'm sure Ben's section has benefited from his
> mouthpiece expertise.
>
> Shall we start a universal health care thread? :^)
>

www.brsmusic.net

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