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 More on how to start :)
Author: contragirl 
Date:   2005-05-26 03:38

Are there any good sources on the web that can help me learn more klezmer. Like maybe written out parts of common melodies? (Just so I don't have to go out and buy a book). hehe

Oh, I also forgot to ask: Are there specific scales/modes that are commonly used in klezmer? I noticed while trying to play along with a few songs that they have many similar notes... like in the same key.

Thanks again!
CG



Post Edited (2005-05-26 03:40)

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 Re: More on how to start :)
Author: Steve Epstein 
Date:   2005-05-26 05:04

Google Ari's Klezmer Shack. Google Tara Publications. Heck, google Mel Bay. Also, near where you are, in Bethesda or Silver Spring, I forget which (I'm from the Philly area) are several fine Judaica stores, which carry tune books. Not open Friday evening or on Saturday but open Sunday and weekdays.

There are modes, freyggish, in particular. You can learn about those from resources available on those websites.

Steve Epstein

Post Edited (2005-05-26 05:06)

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 Re: More on how to start :)
Author: buedsma 
Date:   2005-05-26 11:09

http://www.bueds.be/webmuziek


Free klezmer music and sites : mostly in english / and some theory articles / and some vide/audio from music groups

see also in the section Listen :Klezmer met video/audio

Th eparts that you proably can't read are dutch :-)

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 Re: More on how to start :)
Author: Ralph Katz 
Date:   2005-05-30 00:41

Try this article with music from Michele Gingras:

http://www.clarinet-saxophone.asn.au/articles/klezmer.pdf

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 Re: More on how to start :)
Author: music_is_life 
Date:   2005-06-03 17:41

there are 2 different modes tyically used in klezmer, (though it's not a standard rule), and they're the most common. the hebrew names are "ahava raba" and "misheberakh"

ahava raba = the Greek phrygian mode. it sounds major...or a minor with a lowered 2nd and raised 3rd. like D, Eb, F#, G, A, Bb, C, D
misheberakh = minor. the pattern is W,H, Aug 2nd, H, W, H, W
...minor with a raised 4th and a raised 6th
(the augmented 2nd is what makes this music sound jewish)

-Lindsie



Post Edited (2005-06-04 02:53)

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 Re: More on how to start :)
Author: Steve Epstein 
Date:   2005-06-04 00:11

music_is_life wrote:


> (the augmented 2nd is what makes this music sound jewish)

Gee, I thought it made it sound Turkish, or Arabic, or Greek, or Romanian, or...what do I know?

> btw- d minor is the main key for all music

Hmm, guess I'll have to stop playing all the klezmer that's in other keys.

Steve Epstein

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 Re: More on how to start :)
Author: music_is_life 
Date:   2005-06-04 02:06

wow, mr. literal. are we not talking jewish music? sure, the augmented 2nd could make it sound...turkish...I guess...but I wasn't really refering to anything else. Klezmer has a certain sound to it. If you throw the augmented second into that scale, it makes it sound jewish, no?

sorry, I knew that d minor= main key was blanket...but I did not say there are no other keys. or that you should stop playing in other keys.

[ Snipped - No ad hominem attacks - GBK ]


-Lindsie



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 Re: More on how to start :)
Author: Steve Epstein 
Date:   2005-06-04 08:42

music_is_life wrote:

> wow, mr. literal. are we not talking jewish music? sure, the
> augmented 2nd could make it sound...turkish...I guess...but I
> wasn't really refering to anything else. Klezmer has a certain
> sound to it. If you throw the augmented second into that scale,
> it makes it sound jewish, no?
>
> sorry, I knew that d minor= main key was blanket...but I did
> not say there are no other keys. or that you should stop
> playing in other keys.


You can augment or diminish and you can play in any key you like. None of that makes anything sound Jewish, Greek, or ethnic of any kind. What makes something sound sound klezmer is your understanding of the style and skills in conveying it. For example, I can make the very old English folk tune Childgrove sound like an ancient Hebrew melody :) Click here http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/music/abc/FindTune.html, plug in Childgrove and hit "find" to see the tune. I do it by wailing and bending notes. But Childgrove is really one of those early music numbers with harmonies in open fifths. Other such tunes I can turn into jazz by just by making them sound that way, by wailing and bending differently. The gifted klezmer clarinettist Margo Leverett has a CD where she makes old-time Appalachian tunes sound klezmer, while old-time fiddlers can do the reverse with klezmer tunes. It has little to do with the key or the mode.

Steve Epstein

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