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 Sticky first octave pad
Author: michkhol 
Date:   2019-03-02 21:57

Newbie question here.

I have a Loree B series oboe. Is it normal, if after minutes of playing the first octave pad becomes sticky and the vent late to open? It is easily fixed by inserting a piece of a paper towel and applying light pressure. But I have to do it several times during my practice. Should the spring be adjusted?

Thanks!



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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2019-03-02 22:25

Have the key removed, the lower 8ve vent insert and the pad cleaned and degreased as well as the spring tension beefed up (more of a curve put into the flat spring). Also have the rod screw cleaned, polished and the old oil cleaned out from the lower 8ve rocker key barrel.

If it's been happening more during low humidity levels, then have the key barrel shortened by a tiny amount to be sure the key will still function when the pillars pull in. Make sure any burrs on the ends of the key barrel are removed so they won't catch on the rod screw when it's fitted.

Chris.

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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: Jim22 
Date:   2019-03-03 05:34

I had this issue. I took the key off and found a fairly deep impression of the tonehole in the face of the cork pad. I carefully sanded the face down, but left the deep part of the impression untouched. Essentially made a shallower impression.

Jim C.
CT, USA

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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: Hotboy 
Date:   2019-03-03 12:49

It could be one of several things, and do NOT use a paper towel or any kind of standard paper for this problem:

1. There could be a minuscule amount of corrosion on the rocker key barrel as Chris P said. Sometimes just loosening and tightening the screw a couple times is enough to solve the problem. Make sure that, when you screw in the screw, that you turn it clockwise just until it stops. Do not tighten it, which can make the posts bind and stop the key from raising.

2. It also might be a sticky remnant of a soft drink you drank a couple weeks ago. To clean the pad, wet the corner of an old soft dollar bill. Place the wet corner under the pad and press lightly. After a minute, pull the bill out while pressing lightly and repeat. Then do the same move with a dry corner of the bill. Money is closer to cloth than paper and is very strong, which allows you to press down moderately while pulling off any contaminant.

3. It also could be that the pad is sticking to the metal insert due to a small burr on the metal. This you will have to take to a qualified repair tech.

Dane
Bay Area, California

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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2019-03-03 22:58

Another problem with the lower 8ve vent is it is prone to being compressed when the case lid is closed or when using a soft-sided case with the lid pocket overloaded with stuff which puts undue pressure on the keywork.

Most oboe cases I see have a deep impression or a hole in the fabric covering the lid cushion caused by the adjusting screw pip on the lower 8ve key digging into it. That will squeeze the pad onto the lower 8ve vent and if there's any moisture still on that pad, it'll end up sticking and corroding the surface of the 8ve insert.

As was mentioned in a previous reply, you can have the pad ground down but leaving the impression in the centre to be sure it seats against the 8ve insert.

Some oboes have an adjusting screw on the 2nd 8ve key to limit how much pressure it exerts on the lower 8ve vent pad, but that's only good if the lower 8ve pad hasn't become compressed from the pressure of being cased up. The adjusting screw on the lower 8ve key is in a particularly vulnerable position and is one of the highest pieces of keywork when the instrument is in its case.

Chris.

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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: michkhol 
Date:   2019-03-04 19:56

After removing the key, cleaning the residue off the insert and the pad, cleaning the screw, oiling and adjusting the spring all is back to normal, thanks a lot!

However have a few questions about what to use for cleaning and oiling.

Cleaning.
I used isopropyl alcohol but I guess it is not the best solution. Or is it?

Oiling. I have
- Sewing machine oil
- Silicone oil
- Labelle 107 oil
- Home Depot multipurpose oil
- Various kinds of motor oil
Can use one of those, or it should be something more specific?



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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: Hotboy 
Date:   2019-03-05 02:25

Light machine oil is good, so I think sewing machine oil would work. Use only the tiniest drop you can. Best to put some on the end of a toothpick and touch the joint between key and post...the oil will seep in.

Dane
Bay Area, California

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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2019-03-05 16:10

Sewing machine oil is non-gumming, so that will be good for oboe keywork. Don't use anything like multigrade oil which is for door or gate hinges as that often contains resin which will gum up keywork.

I use isopropyl on a pipe cleaner to clean out old oil from key barrels and degreasing the screws (using an alcohol soaked cloth or paper towel). You can clean cork pads and the 8ve boxes with isopropyl on a cotton bud/Q tip. Don't scrub the pad hard as that can damage the surface - either wipe gently or use a blotting or rolling motion of the cotton bud to clean it.

Chris.

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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: michkhol 
Date:   2019-03-06 23:34

Thanks!
That's what I did, only I used a lint-free cloth for cleaning. I had to pay attention not to touch the wood with isopropyl though, otherwise it tended to leave spots.



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 Re: Sticky first octave pad
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2019-03-07 03:05

If you do get alcohol on the wood, then rub that area with your finger and that will restore the finish. If not, then use an absolute tiny amount of bore oil and blend it in with a cotton bud. The wood won't be harmed.

Chris.

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