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 Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-03 14:22

Good morning from Germany!
As I've already hinted earlier, I took a ride to a large brass- and woodwinds store and got my hands on these instruments with plenty of time and a room all to myself to compare them and determine which one I like best - and more importantly to me - to find whether my RC such a bad decision 5 years ago as I've thought it to be for a while. Well, it's not, buuut:

I'm going to try to keep it short. I've played a few scales, parts of Weber's Concerto no.1, 1st movement and Stravinsky's third clarinet piece (or parts thereof). Besides playing characteristics, I tried to closely compare the finish, keywork ergonomics and wood quality. I used a Viotto B3 mouthpiece and
2 1/2 Steuer classic reeds Let's cut to the chase then, shall we?

YCL-CSG III
Picking this one up, you'll first wonder if there's one giant block of blackwood Yamaha sheds a piece off for each billet. The wood looked exactly the same like on their lower and higher end models, but perhaps it was the room's dim lighting deluding me...
Then I noticed that the left hand pinky levers were unpleasently loud, with the H-E lever making a ghastly rattling sound with each triller. It seemed to have some play between the posts, but perhaps this was also owing to the metal pins instead of nylon?
The CSG III did nevertheless produce a beatiful, rich sound with a timbre that really earns this instrument the "G" in its name. I liked the responesivness and dynamic posibilities, but there was a certain limitedness chalumeau, at least compared to a certain other instrument. Still, a very rich sound and it handled the throat tones rather well, with a barely hissing Bb and generally few "sidetones".
At first, this weird, kind of elevated hole for the G-C irritated me, but I think one could get used to it. The ergonomics were superb with IMHO the best Eb lever placement of all models I played. Yamahas have a Yamaha keywork and it somehow creates a different feeling than Buffet, not for the better, nor for the worse. It'd take me weeks to determine which one is better in that department, though I did notice that the side B-D# trill key had pleasantly short tavel and just felt well placed, so that it I liked it more than the on my Buffet. Unfortunately there wasn't more time to investigate each key in terms of placement and min. required opening, which I believe one always has to take a look at when planning to repad or change the corks. Generally speaking, the CSG III did very well in that department.
There'll be little to write abound the tuning, it was fine: You have the typical flat Low E + F that you could improve using your embouchure or the optionally available correction key. The altissomo seemed very good to both to the tuner and my ears, with the A responding beautifully even after my favourite F-E trill in the Fantasia from the Weber Quintet where I simply overblow to the A using the E fingering.
Now, what about that rattling key? Unjustly so, the Yamaha was a shopkeeper, often tested, never bought. A completely new 650 lying around didnt have any of these issues and I'd assume that a brand new CSG III would be fine, too, though nylon pins might just be a better solution than we often assume?


Uebel Superior
I'll say it beforehand, it's the clear winner. Why? Well, when looking for a Boehm with a "German" sound, look no further, still, this wouldn't do justice to what it's capable of. First, I liked the finish most and it just felt so nice in my hands, with a beautifully grained, slightly brighter grenadilla body and a somewhat more solid feel to the keywork. Why yes, it uses nylon pins (by now, you might realize I'm obsessed with that topic), but they're way more massive than on any Buffet. This might apply to the rest of the keywork, too, but once again I'd need to have way more time on my hands to determine that. At any rate, the Superior had the most silent keywork of all the instruments I tested.
Starting with this piano B at the beginning of Weber's first concerto, which can sometimes be a dreadful note to play, I was impressed with the dynamic possibilities. It responded like a dream. There is an inherent softness to the clarion and you still quickly reach ff, should you need to. Playing the Stravinsky, I still might not have created this "nervous" sound that definitely suits my RC. Now, bear with me, I've kept talking about a "German" sound and we all now that one shouldn't asses clarinets having any kind of sound as much as we should call the player to account for it, and the more I play in orchestras, the more I feel like it's tied to one's personality. Anyways, as most non-musicians might find the clarinet to be shrill and annoying - to be sure, it's a miracle some kids' ears don't just fall off after they'd play a few notes - but the Uebel simply calmed those tendencies. So that's the "German" sound of this clarinet. Besides, it had the nicest Low E + F, albeit the correction hole in the bell couldn't raise the pitch enough. Nevertheless, a neat feature. Oh, I should've tried some Brahms, too, as I think the Uebel could handle some annoying throat notes very nicely, with virtually no hissing. Also, the altissimo D almost didn't nee the Eb key to raise the pitch and the above-mentioned "Weber trill" (not to be confused with Weber grills ;) ) worked great. Hard to say whether it does beat the Yamaha, I'd probably prefer the Uebel, but can't put my finger on why.
There is one downside: The Eb lever seems to be in the way, I didn't find the placement useful, but could get accustomed, I guess. Now, there's the "Superior II" to look forward to and it seems like they improved on this issue, too, as far as I can tell from the pictures.
The Goretex pads seem like real winners, as they're soft and still durable. You know the hype around this material, but there's no one yet to play on them for years and evaluate them... Some day, we'll find out.

Buffet Tradition
There'd be, as a matter of principle, remarkably little to be said about this instrument. It's GOOD and I'm afraid to tell any Buffet-Hater that it was set up just fine, though unlike with the Yamaha and especially the Uebel, I still felt like one pad had to be reseated (you may guess which one!). But this might be my bias speaking, for the Buffet responded nicely in all registers and was unusually warm and rich. For a Buffet, that is. Everything, from the wood to the ergonomics, conveyed the feeling "BUFFET". Whether this is bland or just the right thing for musicians, I cannot determine, but let me say that I was neither impressed by the unplated posts nor the "most natural form, with no unnecessary changes or overstated technology." (as they put it).. for heaven's sake, it's a clarinet. That being said, I can see now why people chose them so often - you feel the need to buy this instrument like you'd feel the need to finish a packet of crisps once you've started, but why? You know these instruments and you know the wood is probably not aged naturally, still, it is well made and does exactly what you want it to do. It's a mass product.
Once again, the intonation seemed flawless and it'd be unfair to say that it lacked something the other clarinets had. However, I felt that the Clarion and Altissimo could've responded a tad better compared to the similiarly priced Uebel, but still beats my RC. It felt like a better Version of my RC in many departmants, anyways and would have been the instrument of my choice back then - for 3k, not for 3,7, that is. Can you hear the " brand new cylindrical bore"? Nope, sounds like a richer RC.
There was a flaw imminent to many Buffets: The hinge tube of the H-E key already had a significant amount of play, even though the pivot screw on the post (the very last on the lower piece of the clarinet right before the bell) was already screwed in all the way. Uebel, on the other hand, was as smart as to place the post more accurately and still leave some room for later adjustment. We all know, sooner or later they keys WILL start making noises. I'm under the impression that the Uebel's silent keywork will last the longest, with the Buffet's being a bit less bulky, but don't nail me down to on this statement. Nevertheless, this is one deciding detail for me.

There we have it. I was pleasently suprised by the Buffet, seeing all the bias I've developed for years, yet price-performance wise, it's clearly beaten by the Superior, which I'd prefer for it's sound alone. My ranking would be: Uebel>Yamaha>Buffet.
All of these are excellent instruments and I can finally make peace with my RC, which is solid, but not the exactly right choice for my requirements, plus the Superior used to cost 3k and I invested both money and work to make my RC comparable with these instruments.
A favorable 2nd place goes to the Yamaha, as it is more affordable, offers interesting options (plating, additional keys) and will suit a broad range of players with it's darker yet flexible timbre.
The Buffet didn't really lose, there just no point in spending the same money on this instrument when I can have the Uebel. Would it be the better choice for some? Probably not. The Uebel is so free blowing that a it allowed a strong vibrato despite my rather "classical" mouthpiece, another area where it beat the other instruments, but once again only by a smidge.

You can now either trust my writeup, and please, ask any questions you have, or go and try for yourself. I've made my choice and can now easily wait another 2-3 years till having to buy a new instrument. The only interesting option would be to look for a Leitner & Kraus Reform Boehm, which is probably even better than the Uebel. And more expensive...
BTW, I checked out the Uebel 634. For 2k, I expected more. It neither sounded dark and calm as I've expected it, nor could I commend the tuning in any way. In fact, even the correction key, which was poorly placed, couldn't raise the low E enough and both the low E and F were way off, with some other notes not satisfying me, either... The keywork was decent, but one pad was severly misaligned.
This instrument is not produced in Germany, but in China AFAIK and while I liked the finish, it's not much more than an OK clarinet with no remarkable characteristics, so once again you'd need to look for another German clarinet, should you be willing to buy one. There are better instruments, even for 2k.

Best regards,
Christian

Edit: Think I got rid of the spelling mistakes now.



Post Edited (2017-11-03 19:20)

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: tucker 2017
Date:   2017-11-03 16:37

Thanks for the report!

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: KaiLiau 
Date:   2017-11-03 17:27

Great and very neutral review, Christian.

I really like the way you talk about the differences between clarinets with tangible terms like play/travel/cost/response/finish, instead of some vague words. You can really be a good engineer. I also appreciate your subtle sense of humor....Thanks a lot. Truly enjoyable.

Good to know Uebel makes good Boehm clarinets. In US it has even smaller market share and artist presence than Yamaha. Before your review, my only impression about this brand is from their demo for their Preference model on YouTube. The artist doesn't use the Eb key for the altissimo D for his 1st piece and it sounds low to me compared to the clarion D played right before that and I wonder how many people were turned off by that demo. He later used the Eb key for altissimo D in the video though.



Post Edited (2017-11-03 17:29)

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: dorjepismo 2017
Date:   2017-11-03 17:28

Christian,

With the noisy H-E (B-E auf Englisch), when I was playing Buffets, the convention was to put fish skin or, if you didn't have that, a small piece of a thick plastic bag in the socket, and it worked just like nylon but, you know, without the nylon. With an L&K or other Reform Boehm, at least some people who play them say they sound and work better with a German style mouthpiece (and matching barrel), which makes them almost the same as throwing in the towel and going to German system.

Thanks for the write-up!

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-03 18:15

Thanks for the positive feedback guys, you'll have to live with my partially wrong musical terminology because I don't really get behind the english reasoning (at least I don't call it Es-lever :) )

KaiLiau, let me use this opportunity to once again condemn Buffet's marketing apparatus. I've watched the Video about the Tradition and wondered why a bunch of musicians need to use such ambiguous vocabulary, that is to say they spend 5:11 talking rubbish and get 100 likes for it, when in reality, an instruments' characteristics are clear the moment you touch it. Indeed, I greatly enjoyed phoning L&K and asking about their Reform Boehm. When I mentioned other clarinets, they told me that they didn't care about other brands and that they simply made their instruments the way they believed it was right, so there isn't any need for further discussion. Here's an interesting aspect: The very best wood is used for the barrels first, which seems very much in line with what I've discovered: A clarinets responsiveness greatly depends on this little piece of wood, so usually try to put my "Zoom" RC barrel on anything that accepts it with mostly good results, despite being made for the RC only. Amusingly enough, I could tell that the Tradition's responsiveness could have been improved with a different barrel, so no "purity" on top of that instrument. I'd rather agree with the L&K person who pretty much made it clear that their clarinets are a product of handiwork, so he didn't even have that much more to say about their Reform Boehm. Maybe German clarinet marketing has to be improved towards a more talkative character...?

I've been a "mechanic" on the clarinet for years, but after only a decade and a half also gained a bit of musicality on the way. Instruments and instrument making always fascinated me; every single one is unique and still produces a concrete result, which is why I can appreciate both mass-produced and "handmade" ones, though I'm currently leaning more towards the latter as the former is often guided by marketing ideas I don't comply with, Uebel and Oscar Adler so far being an exception.

There is no Boehm that doesn't require a altissimo D correction, either through embouchure or using the key. I'm under the impression that correcting it using the embouchure makes the D sound "dead", so my motto is: Unless you can't finger it, go with the the Eb key.

dorjedorjepismo wrote:

> Christian,
>
> With the noisy H-E (B-E auf Englisch), when I was playing
> Buffets, the convention was to put fish skin or, if you didn't
> have that, a small piece of a thick plastic bag in the socket,
> and it worked just like nylon but, you know, without the nylon.
> With an L&K or other Reform Boehm, at least some people who
> play them say they sound and work better with a German style
> mouthpiece (and matching barrel), which makes them almost the
> same as throwing in the towel and going to German system.
>
> Thanks for the write-up!

Haha, right, and Buffet didn't improve on that with their newer models either! I've solved this issue using teflon band and thick grease, which has silenced the levers for ages now.
The L&K person pointed out that they use a different leverage ratio and tighter tolerances, so I'd expect their Boehm not to have this issue.
Personally, I love Boehm mouthpieces, they seem more flexible. My Viotto (seems the guy making them is dead now...) is actually very dark and more restricted, yet not step-back from the L&K I used back then. And far superior to the Vandoren B45. Some day, I might go back again.



Post Edited (2017-11-03 18:18)

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: dorjepismo 2017
Date:   2017-11-03 19:14

"Personally, I love Boehm mouthpieces, they seem more flexible. My Viotto (seems the guy making them is dead now...) is actually very dark and more restricted, yet not step-back from the L&K I used back then. And far superior to the Vandoren B45. Some day, I might go back again."

You mentioned this before and I agree, that the complete German setup--Oehler and a German mouthpiece--do wonderful things for the altissimo. But for flexibility, and especially flexibility in tone color, Boehm mouthpieces give more options, and possibly a poly-cylindrical or reverse tapered bore as well. Thing with Boehm mouthpieces is that you'd have to devote years of your life and substantial money for travel to really get a handle on what's possible and available. Several people here get into the fine points of different Vandoren models, but there are lots of really great makers, most of whom offer several chamber and facing options, and you never really know whether any given option will work for you without trying two or three examples of it, because each mouthpiece is different even with the same specs. One reason I've done OK with 1010s is that the options are much more limited, and the two biggest name makers live in the same town, though on opposite sides and they drive on the wrong side of the road there. So, you can try the whole range in one day. Like most things in music, luck and being in the right place at the right time are very helpful.

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: seabreeze 
Date:   2017-11-03 19:29

For L&K clarinets you might consider trying the mouthpieces made by Hans Colbers in the Netherlands. He's been using a special wooden blank from L&K that they developed after their experiment with "Zelltec" wood composite was a bit too hard on the facing tools used by most mouthpiece techs (including Colbers). The new wood blank is reputed to have a very smooth, mellow and still colorful sound, is nearly impervious to warping, and can easily be refaced.

https://www.hanscolbers.com/material.php?LN=0.

Your reviews of the three clarinets are helpful, but many orchestral players are most interested in how the clarinets work in the acoustic environment of a large concert hall. Testing these three in a orchestra, with a good listener sitting near the back wall in a full auditorium is most important. (The more densely packed the hall with people, the deader the sound). They would have to be tested against American orchestral players' favorites, the Buffet R13, the Buffet Prestige R13, the Buffet Festival, and the Buffet Tosca, along with that newcomer, the Yamaha CSVR, as well as the Backun MoBa, and the Selmer Signature and Selmer Privilege clarinets under these conditions. How do they blend? Do they rise above the orchestra in solo passages? Also in the same full concert hall, with the clarinet soloist standing, unamplified, in front of the orchestra.

(Statistically, I think I have covered the field. In American pro orchestras probably most play Buffet and a few play Backun, Selmer, Yamaha, and Guy Chadash. It is very rare to see anything else).



Post Edited (2017-11-03 22:20)

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-03 20:03

dorjepissmo, that's why I won't look for any mouthpieces right now. Refering to my teacher, I was sent a variety of mouthpieces from a great shop in Berlin and picked the Viotto. Also, I can't afford buying more right now.

seabreeze, if I wasn't an amateur and had any opportunity to contemplate the accoustics with an orchestra in a concert hall, I'd love to write about that. There's no chance of that happening and no shop to provide me with instruments, I wouldn't know how besides renting some.
Some day, perhaps, more pros will be interested in the Uebels - there's even an orchestra model now, the "Excellence" - but till then I might as well rely on L&K telling me that their Reform Boehm sounds like their regular German clarinet...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjT6XUWdEkM
This might help imagining what the Reform Boehms sound in a orchestra - they're very popular in the Netherlands.
As always, you can't find any more detailed information on a pros' gear...



Post Edited (2017-11-03 20:11)

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Klose 2017
Date:   2017-11-03 21:15

Christian, are you buying a new clarinet? Why don't you simply order a French system one from L & K?

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-03 22:01

Not yet, I had some time on my hands and wanted to compare a few models. I'll probably end up buying from L&K

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: gatto 
Date:   2017-11-04 20:50

>This might help imagining what the Reform Boehms sound in a orchestra - they're very popular in the Netherlands.

It seems that nowadays the principals in the Concertgebouw Orch. Amsterdam and the Rotterdam Philharmonic are playing plain Boehm clarinets, i.e. Buffet (RC Prestige, Festival, Tosca, ...).

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: gatto 
Date:   2017-11-04 21:16

Dear Christian,

thanks for your interesting report.

I also live in Germany. I am wondering whether FMB in Gütersloh has craftsmen in their shop who can adjust clarinets. Is this the case? If finally buying a clarinet I definitely would (and I did) choose a shop who can offer this.

I believe that most of your problems with some clarinets you described can be quickly fixed by an experienced technician. Besides of that one should keep in mind that it is a test of single pieces of clarinets, and another piece of the same model might, of course, sound differently (for the better or the worse).

Of course I understand that clarinet testing is quite time consuming. But I would find it very interesting if you could compare the clarinets you tested (together wth your own RC) with the more expensive models like the RC Prestige.

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-05 14:19

gatto, sometimes it is impossible for me to tell what system clarinetists play on in symphonic orchestras. When I listened to Janson's approach towards the Leningrad Symphony, I certainly thought the clarinets produce that squeaking sound of terror and decampment that would suit the first movement's development towards a kind of "death-march". So I guess I liked the Buffets used there, yet would have believed anyone telling me they played on Reform Boehm.

If you live in Germany, check out Holzbläser Berlin. FMB doesn't exactly offer good tech service, if any. I sent my Buffet RC there as the pad above the lower ring keys was misaligned and got a too small and poorly set pad back!
Even here, some instrument building can be utter crap. Yesterday at concert I took a look at an overhauled Oehler GDR clarinet a fellow clarinetist played for decades. Guess what, Richard Müller in Bremen, besides installing new pads, placed two giant scraps in the wood next to the posts. They obviously slipped when using the wrong sized screwdriver (you could see the slots now had edges!!!). Also they couldn't fix a tenon-barrel issue where it leaks after prolonged playing.

This is why I'll buy from L&K eventually or overhaul on my own, as I got a few tools already.

Anyways, comparing these instruments with my RC or the RC prestige, of which I think I had 4 examples in my hands, I'd say all of them are less aggressive and forward in terms of sound and responsiveness. The Prestige is a popular choice for uni students and really leaves little to be missed, but it doesn't exactly follow the German sound ideal. I'd just describe it as a better version of the RC, maybe it does sound a bit softer, it certainly offers a better dynamic range and an easier altissimo. I'd still prefer the Tradition for a tad more calmness.

If you want to closely review what you've ordered and possibly send back if you find too many errors, check out dawkes. The pound is so weak and they offer all-around service with the option to send the instrument back - their terms seem better than anything offered here.



Post Edited (2017-11-05 14:32)

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: gatto 
Date:   2017-11-05 18:37

Christian, I usually also cannot tell just from hearing which system is used by a player on a CD. But often one can find out through the internet, the web sites of the orchestras, videos from performances etc. By the way, is it clear that the Leningrad Philharmonic in the Janson's recording of the "Leningrad" (which I own myself) used Boehm clarinets at that time? At least they used Oehler many decades ago, I do not know when they switched to Boehm.

I can recommend Holger Bastein in Hamburg-Altona. You can make orders in the internet shop, but they also have a quite large shop in Altona. They are craftsmen with a work shop, and they offer a very good service. It has definetely many advantages to buy in such a shop.

I got there my RC Prestige in B-flat and in A. I am only a late-starter hobby player. But I dream of playing in an amateur symphony orchestra sometime when my profession would leave me more time.

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-07 23:01

Well that's interesting, I just assumed they used Buffet, but that doesn't have to be the case indeed. After listening to a record of our recent band concert, I couldn't determine if my RC did or didn't mix well with the other people using the german system. Maybe this is a more substantial problem for professionals in symphonic orchestras?

You'll eventually find the right orchestra, fingers crossed ;) I did enjoy this time and have already started to look back a bit nostalgicly. Surely the RC Prestige won't be a limiting factor!

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: KenJarczyk 2017
Date:   2017-11-08 10:08

Thanks for the review! Your approach seemed very fair and even!

Also, sounds like you have a liking for the darker “German” sound.

Curious - seeing your in Germany, have you had opportunity to play any of the “Reform-Boehm” clarinets popular in that neck of the woods?

Ken Jarczyk
Woodwind Guy
Clarinets, Saxophones and I own several Flutes.

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Wes 
Date:   2017-11-08 11:56

Thank you for some interesting reviews and analysis. Despite my living in a very large urban city, I have no idea how one could try the Uebel and Yamaha clarinets. There are a few places where one could try Buffet R-13s, but maybe not the Tradition.

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-08 20:27

KenJarczyk wrote:

" Curious - seeing your in Germany, have you had opportunity to play any of the “Reform-Boehm” clarinets popular in that neck of the woods?"

To tell the truth, no, and I haven't ever seen one live. They're surprisingly uncommon, and if people play Boehm here, it's usually Buffet or Yamaha. All I can say is that they're supposed to be as comfortable to play as Boehms, so you'd expect to see more of them. Sooner or later I have get my hands on one, that's for sure :)

My liking the "German" sound is probably caused by growing up with it. I do try to think more objectively about it, but still can't wrap my head around Buffet being so wildly popular. I mean, the CSG III is a better instrument than my RC without any doubt, yet I chose the Buffet myself??? Why??? Partly, because I was talked into buying it, partly because I didn't know better - this is how I imagine many end up with Buffet, but as I've pointed out, they're not that much worse, just overpriced.
I'm really taken with the YCL 650, it's such an affordable Instrument for what it does - granted you get a decent mouthpiece!

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: dorjepismo 2017
Date:   2017-11-09 17:50

Embrace the Dark Side. It's your destiny!

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-12 14:12

Uebel aktually means "bad, ill, evil" (though if you're feeling "übel", you might just have a stomache :) )
Check out this: http://woodwindwonderland.blogspot.de/2016/07/uebel-clarinets-in-21st-century-primer.html
This guy praises the entire Uebel line. I enjoyed the different pictures, looks like they use a very nicely aged grenadilla or at least managed to make it look so, something important to me when chosing an instrument. Buffets on the other hand sometimes look like resonite - not that I'd be afraid of buying one.

Edit: According to the poster of that website: "The Preference is made of unstained grenadilla aged 5-7 years naturally.
No wonder it looks nicer than a Buffet then.
Again, I didn't intend to bash them, but by now I can tell when wood comes from of a kiln or a good old fashioned wood yard.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vzOtANvyN8
Just the first seconds. Neat!



Post Edited (2017-11-12 14:15)

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: dorjepismo 2017
Date:   2017-11-13 18:06

Aren't there similar issues with the literal translation of "Bösendorfer" and "Mühlfeld?"

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Kalashnikirby 
Date:   2017-11-13 22:00

Indeed, one means "Evil-Villager", the other "Mill-field" :D

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: D Dow 
Date:   2017-11-17 21:37

I have played on the Uebel french clarinets and was very surprised. For me the CSG is just a better clarinet for the Boehm and surpasses the Wurlitzer pro models I have tried. It seems to me the key element of the CSG is the immediate quality of the tone. This is quick clean response to positive air pressure. The closest 2cd would be a pro model Wurlitzer. As to other brands I do not like MOba clarinets ..the sound lacks the bite orchestral playing requires..in a recent recording for imax films my CSG Yamahas worked wonderfully with fine tuning. So after reading the extensive Uebel review maybe the day will come we have this firm making clarinets just as fine as Buffets!

David Dow

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: seabreeze 
Date:   2017-11-17 23:11

David,

I can't tell from what you are saying exactly what you thought of the Uebel Boehm. Did you try the Superior model or some other models? How did the Uebel you try compare to the Yamaha CSG?

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 Re: Play-tested: YCL-CSG III, Uebel Superior, Buffet Tradition
Author: Klose 2017
Date:   2017-11-17 23:34

David, when you say Wurlizter pro model, you mean 100c soloist or 185 artist?

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