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 Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Lockster 
Date:   2017-09-09 18:42

Hi all,

I'm new here but have been reading posts for ages.

I've played on a Yamaha 450 for many years, and am finally able to upgrade to a custom Yamaha. I currently use a M30, and was curious, which mouthpieces go well with these instruments? I know it's a combo of Reed/mouthpiece/ligature, but any thoughts?

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: kdk 2017
Date:   2017-09-09 23:25

Not being a Yamaha player myself, my first reaction is that any good quality mouthpiece should work as well on a Yamaha as it does on anything else. I don't think Yamahas require any special or proprietary design features.

What do you mean by "a custom Yamaha?"

Karl

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Chris P 
Date:   2017-09-09 23:54

kdk wrote:

"What do you mean by "a custom Yamaha?"

One of the following - YCL-CX, SEVR, CSVR, CSGIII or SE-A, all of which are Custom series Yamaha clarinets.

Chris.

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2017-09-10 08:29

You really have to try it out, different barrels, tapers, all of that. The M series mouthpieces play a tad bit flat in the upper register as the oboes and flutes go a tad bit sharp, so if you are in a symphony or a band it will probably bother you. If you don't the mouthpiece will sound good as it will probably only drop from say 440 to 438 or so. This is an example. It may drop 1 point or not at all but the other wind players will go sharp to 442. The sound quality of the M series mouthpieces is fine. I like other Vandorens much better. I really like the new Selmer mouthpieces. A must for everyone to try. The pricing is excellent.

So I can't tell you what to do as I'm only aware of the CSVR horns. The intonation is excellent, a beautiful sound, the A clarinet is by far the best A clarinet I've ever played, because of the resistance feels just like a Bb clarinet. It's open and a blast to play.

I feel you should try all of the horns out. I haven't heard a bad thing yet. When I hear of top players switching from Tosca's and other top horns to the Yamaha's well we all should try them out. When players say they play great right out of the case we have to at least listen and test one.

There mouthpieces suck!

STEUER REEDS Importer played by Sabine Meyer

NEWLY DESIGNED "Vintage 1940 Cicero" Mouthpieces

Yamaha Artist




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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Toolaholic 
Date:   2017-09-10 17:46

I didn't think the hard rubber 4CM that came with my 650 played all that bad. My daughter used it on my plastic Yamaha 20 in a local musical and did ok with it. That being said I use a vandoren M30 profile 88 ( grand concert select 3 1/2)on my 650 with outstanding results.

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Lockster 
Date:   2017-09-11 00:00

Thanks all,

I should clarify. I've been testing out 3 Yamaha's to make a purchase. 1 CSVR and 2 CSGIII Bb horns. I just didn't know if I should take my mouthpiece choice into consideration as well. I.e. maybe one plays better with a different mouthpiece? Or does that not matter in terms of choosing a horn. Ultimately I understand that once I choose a horn, I can then play around with mouthpieces to see if there are changes I like. I just didn't know if my current mouthpiece could influence my opinion on how these babies play.

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2017-09-12 03:45

Take your meter with you to test the tuning and pitch, or your phone. Phones have meters with them now. Well my I-phone does. Be concerned with the 10ths.

I'm not sure how much homework you've done. Both horns are very nice. I've played the CSG111, but not the the latest model. The CSG111 is a wonderful clarinet and it has a straight bore. The other pro models do not have straight bores.

So be careful when testing the horns, looking for dead notes or notes that don't speak well with your mouthpiece. Changing mouthpieces can surely be a plus to solve these issues. We have to remember that the mouthpieces have tapered bores. This can make such a difference in making a good clarinet sound and a fantastic horn. Of course barrels and the tapers are will change the pitch. It can get complicated.

STEUER REEDS Importer played by Sabine Meyer

NEWLY DESIGNED "Vintage 1940 Cicero" Mouthpieces

Yamaha Artist




Post Edited (2017-09-12 05:35)

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Bob Bernardo 
Date:   2017-09-12 05:52

The issue I have with the Yamaha mouthpieces is where are they from? Some were made by Babbitt. Not anymore. These were decent. The ones being made now have tip openings of 1.15, too open for kids in my opinion. And too open for most pro's.

This is why I don't like them at all. I've actually tried to contact them and work with them making a less open mouthpiece, but they really blew me off. I couldn't get a number, a contact person, nothing. People will be able to pick them up on auction sites for maybe $10 or something like that. I think pro horns deserve pro mouthpieces, meaning something very special. So for players that like fairly open mouthpieces jump on these.

STEUER REEDS Importer played by Sabine Meyer

NEWLY DESIGNED "Vintage 1940 Cicero" Mouthpieces

Yamaha Artist




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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: SonicManEXE 
Date:   2017-09-13 02:48

Current-era Yamaha mouthpieces suck. Period. My studio-mates and I call the 4C "the doorstop." I say current-era because maybe a long time ago they were made better, but I can tell you any made within the past several years is not worth playing on in a concert setting. Some of my friends in marching band use the 4C that came with the student model Yamaha horns they use and they sound fine, but from personal experience I can tell you that sometimes the mouthpiece would not give me a sound. Maybe the mouthpiece isn't finished properly or has a flaw in the cork or something (I still have it for dire emergencies or in case of an instrument petting zoo), but it was very bizarre.

I've said time and time again that I'm not the biggest Yamaha fan in the world, but if you're trying them with your current setup and you enjoy them, go for it. I think the M30 is a great mouthpiece and there's no reason to switch unless you're going for something different. For me the upgrade from a student model Yamaha to the Tradition made a world of difference in the character of my sound, but of course going from an absolute beginner's plastic horn to a professional level wood one will do that. I think as long as you avoid Yamaha mouthpieces, or even stay with the one you have, you'll be fine.



Jared
Ft. Lauderdale, FL & Tampa, FL

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Lockster 
Date:   2017-09-13 02:53

Thanks for all the advice, this upgrade has been many years in the making (I've gone through undergrad at a reputable institution with my "baby" Yamaha, due to financial issues), and so I was in no way intending on playing the 5C that came with these customs. I was more curious I think, since I believe my mouthpiece is 7 years old now haha.

Maybe it's time for a new one regardless of the horn?

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: kdk 2017
Date:   2017-09-13 04:55

7 years is not old for a mouthpiece. Unless there is damage, especially to the rails, 7-years-old isn't a reason in itself to replace a mouthpiece. If you like the M30, I'd say to keep using it for the time being. Later, after you've gotten used to the new clarinet, if you want to explore other mouthpieces, go for it. But I don't know a reason why an M30 wouldn't play as well on a Yamaha "custom" as it does on anything else.

Karl

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Tom Puwalski 
Date:   2017-11-02 15:55

I totally disagree with the "yamaha mouthpieces suck" statement. I recently found out that Loren Kitt was playing on the Yamaha "stock" mouthpiece. Merlin Petroff had reworked the baffle and facing for him. I had 4 mouthpieces from the 4 clarinets I own and I sent them to Merlin and I think they play great.

Loren Kitt was really particular about mouthpieces, I think he found as I have there is something about the Yamaha mouthpiece particularly on Yamaha clarinets. Here is a clip of me playing the Yamaha CSVR with a Petroff rebuilt Yamaha 4CM mouthpiece https://soundcloud.com/klezmertom/chorando-pra-pixinguinha

Tom Puwalski, Yamaha and D'Addario performing artist.

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 Re: Yamaha's and mouthpieces
Author: Jordan Selburn 
Date:   2017-11-02 19:22

Bob, as a "Yamaha Artist" you can't even get a contact number?

As far as Yamaha (and Buffett, earlier) not replying to your suggestions, that's probably corporate policy for patent/intellectual property protection. At my company, we are mandated to not reply to any unsolicited emails of product or technology ideas, but to immediately forward them to our legal department.

Jordan

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