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 a wood clarinet question
Author: Shelly 
Date:   2001-04-10 00:29

I am in the market for a new clarinet and I have been thinking that a wood clarinet would be nice :) I live in central Florida and I am sure you know that it is very hot and very humid here. I worry that a wood clarinet wouldn't do well in this climate. So, I think maybe I should go plastic (how I hate that word!...... Resonite or whatever) Any advice?

Shelly

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Irwin 
Date:   2001-04-10 01:04

I live in Fort Lauderdale which has a more humid climate than central Florida, and I've not had a problem with my R-13. There are certain rules that if followed should prevent a wooden clarinet from having more problems here than anywhere else. Namely, don't subject your clarinet to temperature extremes, swab it well after playing and oil the bore only as recommended by the manufacturer (R-13's don't need bore oil). I think the humidity is actually a good thing for the wood as opposed to a very dry climate, although there are other people on the board who would know better than I do.

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Mindy 
Date:   2001-04-10 01:31

I live in central Fl too and I don;t have a problem with my clarinet. Like Irwin said there are certain rules that needs to be followed. Like don't leave in the car. ( that is hard for me I am very bad at leaving my clarinet in the car and I hate it ) All the advice I can give you is that to follow what Irwin said I say the same things.
I hope this helps
Mindy

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: LIZZIE 
Date:   2001-04-10 01:50

YOU SHOULD TOTALY GET A WOOD ONE AND TRY A BUFFET CRAMPTON
R-13 THAT IS WHAT I REALLLLY WANT!

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Dee 
Date:   2001-04-10 02:04

First decide if you want a student or intermediate or professional grade instrument. That decision should be made before deciding on the material although the material will then limit your choice of models.

1. Student grade horns: These are generally of plastic. Stick to the Big Four (Leblanc, Selmer, Buffet, Yamaha). Leblanc makes their Vito in a Vito VSP version that is wooden but the regular Vito is plastic as well as the student horns by the other makers. If you see a wooden beginner horn by some other company, pass. You'll generally be better off with a plastic horn by one of the main makers.

2. Intermediate horns: To the best of my knowledge, these are wooden but some may have plastic barrels and/or bells. I don't know of any plastic intermediate horns. Again stick to the Big Four.

3. Pro horns: Almost all of these are wooden. Unless you have time to do the research on specialty makers, again stick to the Big Four. Among these four, only Buffet has plastic versions, known as Greenlines, available. Many people say the Greenlines play just like their wooden counterparts so if you are concerned about cracking and climate induced effects in general, this may be something you want to look into.

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Kim L 
Date:   2001-04-10 03:30

IMHO, I'd worry more about the variation in weather in the Northeast where I live, than the Southeast where you live. The cold weather can be devastating to clarinets, however I own an R-13. As long as you take proper care of your instrument, it will be okay.

Good luck,

Kim L.

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Graham Golden 
Date:   2001-04-10 03:46

Hi,

I would love to have a humid climate for my clarinet!!! Here in New Mexico with extremely dry and high climate that fluctuates from very hot to very cold clarinets crack all the time!!!

I don't think that a humid climate would have a negative effect at all.

Graham

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: David Kinder 
Date:   2001-04-10 05:31

Sorry Dee,

Buffet R-13 Greenlines aren't plastic... yet they have many plastic characteristics. NEVER need bore oil, 3 year warrantee against body defects, and they don't fluctuate their tone in weather.

Greenlines are made out of the wood "sawdust" and molded with some plastic component(?) to form and shape the wood billets. They are quality instruments, but I prefer the wood grain in the bore to help with the characteristics of the tone of that particular instrument.

Just my $0.02 worth.

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Sylvain 
Date:   2001-04-10 14:40

I won a greenline instrument and so do many people.

I can tell you that it sounds just as good as any other wooden clarinet that I have heard.

The bottom line is that you should go out and try a few (or lots if you can). Pick the one you like the most. If you choose a wooden one then take good care of it and it won't crack.

What is really dangerous for a clarinet is sharp changes in humidity and temperature and extreme temperature.

But really choose the clarinet you think sounds the best, have your teacher try a few for you and do not rush your decision.
-S

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Benny 
Date:   2001-04-10 23:57

My teacher told me that the wood makes no difference - it's all the bore. But sure, what the heck. Go with the wooden clarinet (I recommend the R-13).

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Hiroshi 
Date:   2001-04-11 05:07

Temperature(or its abrupt changes) rather than humidity will affect the material inner stress. (If you are right, there would be very scarce wooden clarinet population density in areas with humid climates). In Tokyo area humidity becomes 100%RH during rainy season. I have never experienced any cracks with my wooden clarinets.

Some people say that material does not matter just like Benny's teacher. I guess they read and believe what academics say such as in the Benade book. But many of them play wooden clarinets, I am quite sure. Why? I guess although they would like to believe 'theory', actually their intuition senses material differnece matters. Maybe human being's perceptions are far keener than present smart audio measurement devices academics use. IMHO.

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Mark Charette 
Date:   2001-04-11 05:22

Or perhaps the aesthetics of wood pleases them more than plastic. I know that's <b>my</b> excuse.

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: Dee 
Date:   2001-04-12 02:11

David Kinder wrote:
>
> Sorry Dee,
>
> Buffet R-13 Greenlines aren't plastic... yet they have many
> plastic characteristics. NEVER need bore oil, 3 year warrantee
> against body defects, and they don't fluctuate their tone in
> weather.
>
> Greenlines are made out of the wood "sawdust" and molded with
> some plastic component(?) to form and shape the wood billets.
> They are quality instruments, but I prefer the wood grain in
> the bore to help with the characteristics of the tone of that
> particular instrument.
>
> Just my $0.02 worth.

Sorry David but it is a "filled" plastic and the filler happens to be sawdust. The fact that it is sawdust instead of something else or totally unfilled is simply an advertising ploy on Buffet's part to get people to accept something other than wood for pro instrument. Actually I hope they are successful so that other makers eventually bring forth pro horns of composites and/or plastics. This has been discussed many times on the bulletin board before.

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 RE: a wood clarinet question
Author: joseph o'kelly 
Date:   2001-04-16 23:39

There is a line of clarinets by Buffet called the greenline. Real wood billets are put under extreme pressure to form a un-crackable clarinet. Oboe players have found great success in these instruments. Avalible in R-13 and Festival options these might be to your advantage. I have heard these are a bit brighter sounding than traditional models. It does not hurt to try some out though.

One other thing to consider. A wood instrument is more prone to cracking during the first year after its manufacturing date. During this time the wood is curing. You might want to consider a used or new/old stock instrument.

I must let you know I life in Michigan and have by strange coinsidence had many wood clarinets pass through my hands. All of these have cracked in the winter and never the summer.

Do not saccrifice the quality of a wood instrument for any reason. I would just buy the clarinet that plays best for me and get insurance on it. If a crack should occur it could always be fixed by pinning it.

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