Advertising and Web Hosting on Woodwind.Org!

Woodwind.OrgThe Clarinet BBoardThe C4 standard

 
  BBoard Equipment Study Resources Music General    
 
 New Topic  |  Go to Top  |  Go to Topic  |  Search  |  Help/Rules  |  Smileys/Notes  |  Log In   Newer Topic  |  Older Topic 
 Researching Buffet Eb clarinet
Author: Kristin Sallee 
Date:   1999-09-28 13:31

I found a Buffet Eb clarinet & would like to know more about it before I have it restored. Below the Buffet stamp on the bell is another stamp, "C.Fischer, New-York." The serial # appears to be J591. Thanks for any info you can give me.

Reply To Message
 
 RE: Researching Buffet Eb clarinet
Author: Ken Shaw 
Date:   1999-09-28 13:53

Kristin Sallee wrote:
-------------------------------
I found a Buffet Eb clarinet & would like to know more about it before I have it restored. Below the Buffet stamp on the bell is another stamp, "C.Fischer, New-York." The serial # appears to be J591. Thanks for any info you can give me.


Kristen -

According to the Buffet serial number chart here on Sneezy, the horn dates from 1895. The important thing is to look for the letters "L.P." on the front near the top or on the bell, usually just above or below the trademark. This indicates "low pitch" -- that is, A=440. If it's stamped "H.P." it's pitched at A=452 and is unusable in an ensemble.

For many years, Carl Fisher had an exclusive license from Buffet to import its clarinets into the U.S., and the stamp you see appears on every Buffet from that era.

Buffets from before the early 1950s did not have the current small polycylindrical bore. The larger bore instruments have a wonderful sound, but the intonation can be difficult to control, since the larger bore makes notes more pitch-sensitive to changes in lip pressure. This problem can be very bad on old instruments where the bore has been enlarged by years of swabbing.

On the other hand, I have a Buffet C clarinet from the early 1920s that has very stable intonation, so you have to evaluate each one individually.

The older instruments may also benefit from an older-style mouthpiece - Chedeville style rather than Kasper style. I know that Greg Smith makes both styles, as do other makers. It would be worth getting a really fine mouthpiece if the instrument plays well after restoration.

Good luck. Let us know how things work out.

Ken Shaw

Reply To Message
 Avail. Forums  |  Threaded View   Newer Topic  |  Older Topic 


 Avail. Forums  |  Need a Login? Register Here 
 User Login
 User Name:
 Password:
 Remember my login:
   
 Forgot Your Password?
Enter your email address or user name below and a new password will be sent to the email address associated with your profile.
Search Woodwind.Org

Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale

The Clarinet Pages
is sponsored by:

For Sale
Put your ads for items you'd like to sell here. Free! Please, no more than two at a time - ads removed after two weeks.

Reeds
Great reeds available from around the world

Instruments
Retailers and manufacturers of clarinets, both modern and early replica

Events
Major events especially for clarinetists

Accessories
Accessories that every clarinetist needs - reed makers and shapers, ligatures, greases, oils, and preservatives ... and more!

Music & Books
CDs, Sheet Music, and some of the greatest reference books ever written!

Miscellaneous
Services and products too varied to categorize! Repair, recording, news

Service
Instrument repairs, restorations, adjustments, and overhauls.

Mouthpieces & Barrels
Fine makers of mouthpieces and barrels, from wood to crystal to hard rubber and plastic

 
     Copyright © Woodwind.Org, Inc. All Rights Reserved    Privacy Policy    Contact charette@woodwind.org