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 Selmer Series 10G
Author: Chris 
Date:   1999-09-21 04:18

I have asked alot of questions, but it is so much fun! What is your take on the Selmer Series 10G, any ideas are good. Mine was a 1975, if that info is needed... thanks!

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: Mark Charette 
Date:   1999-09-21 12:00

I have a 1994 Selmer 10G, whioch I play with a Hawkins mouthpiece, stock barrel, and Spriggs ligature. The tone is a bit "brighter" than I'd like, and the clarinet a bit heavier than I'd like, but I just _love_ the keywork.

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: Mike B. 
Date:   1999-09-21 14:12

I've played my friend's 10G a couple of times. I like the horn. Very good tone, solid construction, dead on intonation. It plays similarly to my Seris 9 (which I like a lot).

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: Brent 
Date:   1999-09-21 16:54



Chris wrote:
-------------------------------
I have asked alot of questions, but it is so much fun! What is your take on the Selmer Series 10G, any ideas are good. Mine was a 1975, if that info is needed... thanks!

My 10G Bb is from 1975 also, and my A from 1977. They are wonderful instruments, as far as i am concerned. I have played new LeBlanc and Buffet clarinets and these play every bit as well in tune as the best of them, and better than most. I agree with Mark, the sound can be bright, but you can compensate for that with mouthpiece/reed and (most importantly) good embouchure.

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: Mark Charette 
Date:   1999-09-21 17:22

Brent wrote:
-------------------------------
I agree with Mark, the sound can be bright, but you can compensate for that with mouthpiece/reed and (most importantly) good embouchure.
-----------
Not entirely. The bright characteristics come out no matter _who_ plays it (and I've had a few really good people play it).

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: Mike B. 
Date:   1999-09-21 19:03

Ya know -

Bright can be a good thing. Examples: French school tone production. Jazz. Projection in a solo situation.

Opinion ON: sometimes if you try to be too dark, your tone ends up sounding deadened and dull.

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: Ken Shaw 
Date:   1999-09-21 19:15



Mark Charette wrote:
-------------------------------
Brent wrote:
-------------------------------
I agree with Mark, the sound can be bright, but you can compensate for that with mouthpiece/reed and (most importantly) good embouchure.
-----------
Not entirely. The bright characteristics come out no matter _who_ plays it (and I've had a few really good people play it).


Mark -

Gigliotti has always favored a bright sound, which he felt he needed in order to be heard over the famously luxuriant Philadelphia Orchestra strings. I think he was right, although it didn't record too well. He sounded much better in person.

At the Oberlin workshop several years ago, just before he retired, he did a good deal of playing in his master classes. He sounded quite bright, with incredible projection. He played the "nightingale" solo from the Pines of Rome at a vanishingly soft dynamic, yet it crackled with energy and could be heard clearly at the back of the infamously dead Oberlin concert hall.

In an interview in The Clarinet, he said that a standing joke in the Philadelphia Orchestra is that the winds have 3 dynamics: soft, loud and btsooi (blow the s**t out of it).

I've always thought the 10G was at its best in a large orchestra.

Ralph Morgan has some wonderful stories about the development of the 10G, and which serial number series has the good ones.

Best regards.

Ken Shaw

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: Mark Charette 
Date:   1999-09-21 19:35

Ken Shaw wrote:
-------------------------------
I've always thought the 10G was at its best in a large orchestra.
----------
Ken, it very well may be.

Unfortunately, I started way too late to find out :^(

However, that being said, I, too, have tried the Rossi. I found that to be "sparkly" and "bright" without the 10G edginess. Besides all the other wonderful attributes. If/when I have the money, it'll be high on my list!

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 RE: Selmer Series 10G
Author: David Blumberg 
Date:   1999-09-21 23:09

I've played in Orchestra next to Gigliotti, and he has one heck of a huge sound!! The 10G is known for really good intonation - the A Clarinets are among the best in-tune without any work I have played. I myself play the Buffet Prestige, but would play a 10G with Tony to blend if needed.

David Blumberg
http://www.mytempo.com

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