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Klarinet Archive - Posting 000045.txt from 2010/12

From: "Keith Bowen" <keith.bowen@-----.com>
Subj: Re: [kl] kl] Snake Charmers
Date: Sat, 04 Dec 2010 17:51:09 -0500

I did hear the effect last summer at a masterclass at Clarinetfest, where a
very distinguished clarinetist was trying to get a student, who resembled a
slothful iceberg, to move just a little. He made exaggerated sweeping
movements with the clarinet and the variation of intonation was quite
distinct. Of course, this was far more than he would do in concert.

If you doubt it, try playing a steady note in front of a hard wall, and
walking towards the wall while playing as steadily as you can. You should be
able to hear the beats between the direct sound from the instrument and the
wave reflected from the wall. Of course this doubles the effect as your
sound image is moving towards you, but it should show that it is not
trivial.

Up and down movement (relative to the observer) will have no effect, which
still leaves plenty of scope for the movers and shakers without effect on
the sound, unless you are listening from directly above their heads.

And the effect will be far less perceptible to the player. =

Keith

-----Original Message-----
From: Martin Marks [mailto:martymarks@-----.com] =

Sent: 04 December 2010 20:27
To: The Klarinet Mailing List
Subject: Re: [kl] kl] Snake Charmers

This is a very impressive math exercise, however I have several Meyer's
recordings and can't hear the doppler effect. =A0If we can't hear it, who
cares? =A0I can't hear it on Frost's CD's either. =A0Are you using math to
justify your argument against motion?

On Dec 03, 2010, at 01:05 PM, Tim Roberts <timr@-----.com> wrote:

"Jim Lytthans" <lytthans@-----.net>
> I've been reading the many, many comments on moving clarinetists. My real =

> issue with over-done movement with wind players is the Doppler effect. I
can =

> hear this moving train pitch shift on recordings of clarinetists
especially, =

> and also with flutists and oboists.

My initial reaction was to scoff at this. Intuitively, it seemed
impossible that a clarinetist could generate enough speed to Doppler
shift the pitch to a detectable degree. Being an engineer, I decided to
run the numbers.

I read that a frequency difference of 0.3% is detectable by the human
ear. Running that through the Doppler equations, it would require a
velocity of 0.5 meters per second to generate that difference.

So, I no longer scoff. It's quite possible for an over-enthusiastic
player to move their bell at a rate higher than 0.5m/s.

-- =

Tim Roberts, timr@-----.com
Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.

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