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Klarinet Archive - Posting 000031.txt from 2010/12

From: bhausmann1@-----.net
Subj: Re: [kl] Snake Charmers
Date: Fri, 03 Dec 2010 12:48:13 -0500

There is a name for it when the movement comes to dominate the music: marching band.
Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: "Keith Bowen" <keith.bowen@-----.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Dec 2010 08:46:45
To: 'The Klarinet Mailing List'<klarinet@-----.com>
Reply-To: The Klarinet Mailing List <klarinet@-----.com>
Subject: Re: [kl] Snake Charmers

I think there are two huge exceptions.

One is in chamber music, where you have to communicate your rhythm and
expression to the other players. Usually this is done before the entry, so
aural clues alone are not enough. Of course, excessive movement is
distracting, but appropriate movement (from the pelvis, as it aids breathing
and posture) is useful and necessary. The model of course is a string
quartet.

The other is Les Bons Becs. Has anyone seen their amazing show? It isn't
just movement, it is choreographed gymnastics, and one of the most musical
and exciting entertainments I have seen.

Movement can be another way of communicating with the audience. As long as
it is about the music rather than about the player.

Keith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kevin Fay [mailto:kevin.fay.home@-----.net]
Sent: 03 December 2010 05:30
To: 'The Klarinet Mailing List'
Subject: Re: [kl] Snake Charmers

Jim Lytthans posted:

<<<Once I heard David Shifrin play the K. 622 locally. He really moved about
with the famed Shifrin Squat, until he let out a gigantic squeak. During the
rest of the concerto he stood perfectly still......>>>

Methinks that Jim has hit the nail on the head.

If a little movement helps your performance, why, go for it. I can
understand how a bit of kinetic engagement can help with rhythm, expression,
even add to the show.

OTOH, there are only a few pieces that actually call for a clarinet player
to dance whilst playing - Stockhausen's "Harlekin" (Harlequin) comes to
mind.

I have had the opportunity to watch a number of fine groups - for film work,
and orchestral recording sessions too - and was struck by how different
people behaved when the recorded sound was paramount and there was no
audience to watch. Musicians moved less. Conductors - a *lot* less
dancing, a lot more careful delineation of the rhythm. No odd facial
distortions, agony or orgasm with the baton put down.

I don't go to concerts to watch people play; I'd rather hear them.

kjf

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