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Klarinet Archive - Posting 000430.txt from 2000/04

From: Gary@-----.com
Subj: Re: [kl] Music Education = Academic Achievement (was Student mo
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2000 20:08:50 -0400

My opinion based on my own observations is that the characteristics that
enable students to succeed in academics are closely related to the skills
needed to become a good high school musician. I also believe that most
students who possess these skills and find they are do not achieve the
same level in music as in their other activities drop instrumental music
before reaching high school.

However, I don't think it works the other way. Some of the very finest
musicians I knew in school were not especially motivated academically
because their focus was almost exclusively on music.

Gary
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charette@-----.org
04/10/00 07:56 AM
Please respond to klarinet

To: klarinet@-----.org
cc:
Subject: Re: [kl] Music Education = Academic Achievement (was Student mo
In the studies I've looked at (including that MENC) one, the two questions
that I really want answered are:

1) Does listening to good music (whatever _that_ is) help you become
smarter (whatever _taht_ means) or
2) Does playing music help you become smarter? or
3) Do smart people listen to good music? or
4) Do smart people play good music?

maybe there's some interesting combinations of the above, too.

In any case it's always win-win situation as long as you listen to or play
music! :^)

There was a study a while back that ended up being called "The Mozart
Effect" which was misconstrued by the popular press as showing that
listening to Mozart could help you become smarter. The reality of that
study was that it showed that college students performed a test involving
short-term memory better after listening to Mozart than a control group.
It couldn't be extrapolated to either long-term memory or to non-college
students.

Mark Charette@-----.org,
who makes sure his kids are exposed to music listening & playing, becuase
it's good for the soul (whatever _that_ is) no matter what.

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