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Klarinet Archive - Posting 000597.txt from 1998/04

From: J & K Morgan <morgan@-----.com>
Subj: Re: Smart people and Music (was Music and Science)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 1998 05:02:07 -0400

How would one get copies of the research mentioned below?
Thanks

John Morgan

Rich & Tani Miller wrote:

> Not just secondary educators agree. The most crucial time for a child's
> musical development is from birth up to age 9. Music learning theory
> research bears out the fact that music aptitude which deals mainly with
> aural skills, is pretty much set by this age. Students can still learn
> music after this age certainly but their aptitude pretty much stays the
> same.
>
> It also isn't a just a causal relationship. Current brain research is
> showing many positive benefits of music study and physiological effects
> that music can have upon brain development. It has really become a very
> large field of research. The important key, though, is that students have
> the opportunity to have QUALITY musical experiences at a very early
> age--singing, moving, listening, playing instruments, . . .There are
> certainly positive effects of studying music but research is beginning to
> bear out so much more.
>
> If anyone is interested in this subject and related subjects, some names to
> use as a starting point on the internet include Dr. Edwin Gordon(music
> learning theory research, audiation), Dr. Frances Rauscher(research linking
> spatial reasoning and piano instruction in disadvantaged preschoolers), and
> Howard Gardner (Project Zero, multiple intelligence theory). There's
> another researcher who worked with Dr. Rauscher--I forget the name on this
> sunny Easter day.
>
> My school district has used this and other research as a basis for
> justifying music, art, theatre, and dance study as being equally important
> as all, yes ALL, other subject areas. Students are required to take all
> fine arts areas through the tenth grade. I'm really curious to see what
> kind of effect we'll have on things like standardized test scores although
> that certainly isn't the most important reason for music!
>
> Tani Miller
> Carter & MacRae Elementary School
> School District of Lancaster
> Lancaster, PA
>
> Kevin Fay wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > I think the real link is the true value of music education in our
> > schools. If you want a rough approximation of who the top 10% of
> > students are in any high school, you don't need a test--just stroll down
> > to the band room. (OK, choir and orchestra too.)
> >
> > It could be a causal relationship--learning to practice certainly taught
> > ME how to study--and the immediate feedback of hard work certainly helps
> > a student's focus. On the other hand, it could merely be an effect
> > (i.e., the better students tend to stick with the instrument). Either
> > way, it is an incredibly valuable part of the education process for the
> > more advanced students in secondary education, and (forgive the heat) a
> > goddamned crime that it is among the first things to get cut by
> > brain-dead adminsistrators finding a way to keep the funding for the
> > football team.
> >
> > My wife is a middle school band director. One of the sales pitches she
> > makes to parents is the value that music education has other than in the
> > band room--band students simply do better in school. Oodles of
> > statistics bear this out. I'm sure the secondary educators on this list
> > will agree, and have a huge amount of anecdotal evidence as well. All I
> > can say to them is keep up the good work!
> >
> > kjf
> >
> > --Original Message Follows----
> > Reply-To: "Scott Morrow" <sdm@-----.edu>
> > From: "Scott Morrow" <sdm@-----.edu>
> > To: <klarinet@-----.us>
> > Subject: Re: Music and Science
> > Date: Fri, 10 Apr 1998 11:09:47 -0400
> > Reply-To: klarinet@-----.us
> >
> > I have a BS in Chemistry and have been working in Biochemistry for
> > the
> > last 16 years. I, also, have been playing the clarinet routinely since
> > 4th
> > grade. I believe one of the skills that helps scientific people relate
> > to
> > music is an ability to deal with abstract concepts (you can't "see" a
> > molecule, and try explaining musical interpretation to someone who has
> > to
> > touch or see something to understand it!). Also, music IS very
> > mathematical - it is not difficult to see (especially from some of our
> > more
> > technical posts) that music is mostly a scientific field molded by
> > creativity. (Actually, most of the more important scientific
> > advancements
> > were discovered by creative scientists, not technicians!)
> > I am also a writer (plays and humourous articles) - also sort of
> > abstract! One of the reasons I never went on to a PhD in science is
> > that I
> > DON'T want to give up my "creative" activities!
> >
> > -Scott
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: C E Field <CEField@-----.com>
> > To: klarinet@-----.us>
> > Date: Friday, April 10, 1998 10:03 AM
> > Subject: Re: Music and Science
> >
> > >This is a fascinating topic.
> > >
> > >I am a Ph.D. (food & resource chemistry and chemical engineering) by
> > education
> > >and a computer journalist by trade (with 500 or so published articles
> > in
> > the
> > >past 15 years). I also worked in medical research and teaching.
> > >
> > >BUT clarinets always have been and remain my first love. I started
> > playing
> > in
> > >fourth grade...nearly 40 years ago (ugh).
> > >
> > >Cindy
> >
> > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

   
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