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Klarinet Archive - Posting 000696.txt from 1997/09

From: es <lyler31@-----.com>
Subj: Re: klarinet-digest V1 #249
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 17:43:39 -0400

klarinet-digest wrote:
>
> klarinet-digest Saturday, September 13 1997 Volume 01 : Number 249
>
> Re: Those pesky "base-64" appendages
> Re: clarinet recommends
> Re: Haynes clarinets
> The Chalumeau Register
> RE: BASSET HORN BLUES!! (A short story)
> Re: Haynes clarinets
> stop
> RE: BASSET HORN BLUES!! (A short story)
> Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
> Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
> Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
> Re: The Chalumeau Register
> old Selmer mouthpieces
> Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
> Moss's Nature Studies
> Jack Fetherston,a friend
> Re: Personal Philosophy of teaching
> Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 08:41:29 -0400
> From: Mark Charette <charette@-----.com>
> Subject: Re: Those pesky "base-64" appendages
>
> Jeroen T. Salm wrote:
> > I write my e-mail with Microsofts Internet Mail. Maybe you folks are
> > referring to me. I do not at all know, if my posts are coming to you with a
> > attachement. If so, let ME know, and I will try to fix it.
>
> You're mail is fine, as is most of the mail sent to Klarinet.
>
> > But: why is it, that I do not have those attachements here... Is it maybe
> > so, that my software is (in this case) "better"?
>
> Your software is decoding the ms-tnef because it knows how to.
> Just a word of warning, though - it is very easy for a malicious
> person to do *bad* things to your PC machine via the ms-tnef
> attachements (Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format), since
> OLE objects and ActiveX controls can be sent that way. By the time
> you've figured out that something's gone wrong, it's too late.
>
> tnef is a security hole big enough to drive a large truck through.
> - --
> Mark Charette "How can you be in two places at once
> charette@-----.com when you're not anywhere at all?"
> http://sneezy.mika.com/clarinet - Firesign Theater
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 06:50:24 -0700
> From: Frankie Kelly <fkelly@-----.edu>
> Subject: Re: clarinet recommends
>
> Before you give up on the Buffet clarinets, try the elite!! I purchased my
> instrument because of the quality of the chalumeau range. Call the
> Woodwind for info!!
>
> fjkAt 11:18 AM 9/12/97 +0000, you wrote:
> >I am relatively new to this listserve but am finding it very
> >interesting. I am looking to buy a new clarinet or possibly a matched pair
> if I
> >can find a good price. The clarinet I presently play is a Selmer Series 9
> >full Boehm (which includes the low Eb key among other things). I love
> >the great sounds I get from the bottom register. Probably because my
> >first love is bass clarinet. I am sure that I will start a war when I say
> >this, but I have yet to hear a Buffet that I really like. I know many
> >excellent players who play Buffets. They have a good sound, but it doesn't
> >have the richness i'm looking for in a clarinet. I am looking into a
> >Yamaha AE Custom clarinet. Has anyone played on one? I would be interested
> >in hearing what you thought. If anyone has any ideas, I'd like to hear
> >them.
> >
> >I have also noticed that I get a lot of posts which have unreadable
> >attachments. I have also noticed that about half the time I get replys
> >before I get the original post. Does anyone else notice this?
> >
> >Noelette Stout
> >clarinets@-----.net
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >Get free e-mail and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com
> >
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 09:06:42 -0500
> From: deerich@-----.net
> Subject: Re: Haynes clarinets
>
> Jim Lytthans wrote:
> >
> > ... I think Lockie want something like $450 the pair,
> > which was more that this suffering USC student could afford. Now I kick
> > myself for not somehow buying them, as I kick myself for not buying a
> > Selmer Mark VI alto and tenor sax then (maybe $400 each!). Hind-end
> > sight is wonderful isn't it?
>
> Don't kick too hard. A person has to make choices in life and when one
> is a student, money is short and often dictates one's choices.
>
> Been there, done that.
>
> Dee Hays
> Canton, SD
> deerich@-----.net
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 10:22:31 -0400
> From: avrahm galper <agalper@-----.com>
> Subject: The Chalumeau Register
>
> The Chalumeau Register
> The low register of the clarinet, the Chalumeau, seems to be neglected
> by many players who concentrate on development of the middle and high
> register, to the detriment of what is surely one the of the most
> beautiful and effective tone colors in the whole family of woodwinds.
> Some earlier vituosi also preferred the tone of the middle and high
> register. One of them, Carl Baermann, in the preface to his tutor, says
> "The tone is beautiful when it has a full vibratory metallic clear sound
> and retains its character in all ranges and shadings. In a word, when it
> resembles a full and beautiful soprano voice. If this register (the
> clarion) which is the finest on the clarinet, is beautiful, then the
> lower tones will also necessarily be good."
> One might be tempted to consider this last phrase as a model for
> practice and concentrate on the upper register hoping the low register
> will also be "necessarily" good.
> I think, though, that the low register of the clarinet is the most
> important for control of the entire range of the clarinet.
> It may be of interest to recall an experiment in the last century, of
> acoustician Herman Smith, to find the force of breath expended in the
> oboe, bassoon, trumpet and clarinet.
> In the case of the oboe, bassoon and trumpet, the pressure increased as
> one went up the scale, while in the clarinet the reverse was true, the
> pressure went down.
> This phenomenon was not confirmed a recent experiment with a dummy
> clarinet, when one had to increase the air pressure when one went up
> into the higher register.
> It seems to me that experienced players do as in the Smith experiment,
> while beginners do as in the dummy experiment.
> If one plays in the low register with a soft reed, as most beginners do,
> one would have to increase the air pressure to get the upper register
> satisfactorily.
> If, however, one uses more air pressure in the low register, as playing
> with a harder reed, then one could get the upper register with more
> ease.
> The author of an early clarinet tutor, Thomas Willman, wrote in 1824 "It
> is impossible for the upper notes of the clarinet to be of the right
> quality unless the reed and lip are sufficiently flexible in the
> chalumeau tones. This part of the clarinet scale, the chalumeau, is too
> commonly neglected by Practitioners."
> Many early methods had some low register exercises.
> Klose has pages of low register in his book but does not explain why
> they are there.
>
> I have based my Clarinet Method on the low register concept and it works
> very well.
> One has to have full control of the low register to get the best results
> on the entire clarinet.
>
> Avrahm Galper
> Adjunct Professor
> Faculty of Music
> Toronto University
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 10:58:59 -0400
> From: Virginia Scarfino <scarfinv@-----.net>
> Subject: RE: BASSET HORN BLUES!! (A short story)
>
> I thoroughly enjoyed your story, Dan!
>
> Perhaps your life would have been easier if you had bought two Basset Hounds instead of the two Basset Horns!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 10:04:17 -0500 (CDT)
> From: Roger Garrett <rgarrett@-----.edu>
> Subject: Re: Haynes clarinets
>
> This reminds me, I have a Siver King clarinet.....in relatively good
> shape. It is sterling silver, but I have no use for it. I wonder if
> anyone is interested in it.....
>
> Roger Garrett
>
> On Sat, 13 Sep 1997 deerich@-----.net wrote:
>
> > Jim Lytthans wrote:
> > >
> > > ... I think Lockie want something like $450 the pair,
> > > which was more that this suffering USC student could afford. Now I kick
> > > myself for not somehow buying them, as I kick myself for not buying a
> > > Selmer Mark VI alto and tenor sax then (maybe $400 each!). Hind-end
> > > sight is wonderful isn't it?
> >
> >
> > Don't kick too hard. A person has to make choices in life and when one
> > is a student, money is short and often dictates one's choices.
> >
> > Been there, done that.
> >
> > Dee Hays
> > Canton, SD
> > deerich@-----.net
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 12:22:44 EDT
> From: boehmer@-----.edu
> Subject: stop
>
> stop e-mailing me please and let the server know i do not want to be on this mailing list-thing anymore thank you MANDY BOEHMER
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 10:15:44 EDT
> From: "Dan Leeson: LEESON@-----.EDU>
> Subject: RE: BASSET HORN BLUES!! (A short story)
>
> > From: MX%"klarinet@-----.05
> > Subj: RE: BASSET HORN BLUES!! (A short story)
>
> > I thoroughly enjoyed your story, Dan!
> >
> >
> > Perhaps your life would have been easier if you had bought two Basset Hounds instead of the two Basset Horns!
> >
>
> But who knows. Perhaps people would have seen the animals and
> said, "Oh my!! What lovely basset horns."
>
> In this situation one cannot win.
>
> >
> =======================================
> Dan Leeson, Los Altos, California
> Rosanne Leeson, Los Altos, California
> leeson@-----.edu
> =======================================
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 14:05:20 -0400
> From: Bill Hausmann <bhausman@-----.com>
> Subject: Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
>
> At 09:24 PM 9/12/97 -0700, John Morgan wrote:
> >Michele
> >
> >The way I clean my mouthpiece is with a weak solution of vinegar water.
> >Do not immerse, stand the mouthpiece up in a small glass with the cork
> >clear of the water. I leave for 20 minutes and swab out gently. The weak
> >vinegar gets rid of all the deposits and leaves the mouthpiece clean as
> >new. Hope this helps.
> >
> Swab out and wipe off your mouthpiece after each time you use it and this
> method should seldom be necessary. It should work, though.
>
> Bill Hausmann bhausman@-----.com
> 451 Old Orchard Drive http://www.concentric.net/~bhausman
> Essexville, MI 48732 http://members.wbs.net/homepages/z/o/o/zoot14.html
>
> If you have to mic a saxophone, the rest of the band is too loud.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 11:24:18 -0700
> From: j&k Morgan <morgan@-----.com>
> Subject: Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
>
> Bill Hausmann wrote:
> >
> > At 09:24 PM 9/12/97 -0700, John Morgan wrote:
> > >Michele
> > >
> > >The way I clean my mouthpiece is with a weak solution of vinegar water.
> > >Do not immerse, stand the mouthpiece up in a small glass with the cork
> > >clear of the water. I leave for 20 minutes and swab out gently. The weak
> > >vinegar gets rid of all the deposits and leaves the mouthpiece clean as
> > >new. Hope this helps.
> > >
> > Swab out and wipe off your mouthpiece after each time you use it and this
> > method should seldom be necessary. It should work, though.
> >
> > Bill Hausmann bhausman@-----.com
> > 451 Old Orchard Drive http://www.concentric.net/~bhausman
> > Essexville, MI 48732 http://members.wbs.net/homepages/z/o/o/zoot14.html
> >
> > If you have to mic a saxophone, the rest of the band is too loud.
>
> I should have mentioned I only do this occasionally - every second or
> third week to give the mouthpiece a thorough clean.
> ==============================================================
> John Morgan, P.Eng
> morgan@-----.ca
> ==============================================================
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 13:30:49 -0500
> From: "Donald Walkner" <dwalkner@-----.com>
> Subject: Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
>
> I was told never to run a swab through a mouthpiece because it wears down
> the inside after time and harms your mouthpiece
>
> Amy
>
> - ----------
> > From: Bill Hausmann <bhausman@-----.com>
> > To: klarinet@-----.us
> > Subject: Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
> > Date: Saturday, September 13, 1997 1:05 PM
> >
> > At 09:24 PM 9/12/97 -0700, John Morgan wrote:
> > >Michele
> > >
> > >The way I clean my mouthpiece is with a weak solution of vinegar water.
> > >Do not immerse, stand the mouthpiece up in a small glass with the cork
> > >clear of the water. I leave for 20 minutes and swab out gently. The weak
> > >vinegar gets rid of all the deposits and leaves the mouthpiece clean as
> > >new. Hope this helps.
> > >
> > Swab out and wipe off your mouthpiece after each time you use it and this
> > method should seldom be necessary. It should work, though.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
> > Bill Hausmann
> bhausman@-----.com
> > 451 Old Orchard Drive
> http://www.concentric.net/~bhausman
> > Essexville, MI 48732
> http://members.wbs.net/homepages/z/o/o/zoot14.html
> >
> > If you have to mic a saxophone, the rest of the band is too loud.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 14:50:21 -0400
> From: Bill Hausmann <bhausman@-----.com>
> Subject: Re: The Chalumeau Register
>
> At 10:22 AM 9/13/97 -0400, Avrahm Galper wrote:
> >The Chalumeau Register
> > The low register of the clarinet, the Chalumeau, seems to be neglected
> >by many players who concentrate on development of the middle and high
> >register, to the detriment of what is surely one the of the most
> >beautiful and effective tone colors in the whole family of woodwinds.
>
> AMEN!!!!!
>
> Bill Hausmann bhausman@-----.com
> 451 Old Orchard Drive http://www.concentric.net/~bhausman
> Essexville, MI 48732 http://members.wbs.net/homepages/z/o/o/zoot14.html
>
> If you have to mic a saxophone, the rest of the band is too loud.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 15:11:12 +0000
> From: Ed Wojtowicz <ewoj@-----.net>
> Subject: old Selmer mouthpieces
>
> I am looking for old Selmer clarinet mouthpieces, those with the stamp
> on the table. If anyone has any available, please contact me directly
> rather than clog the list.
>
> Thanks
> Ed
> ewoj@-----.net
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 15:35:03 -0400
> From: Bill Hausmann <bhausman@-----.com>
> Subject: Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
>
> At 01:30 PM 9/13/97 -0500, you wrote:
> >I was told never to run a swab through a mouthpiece because it wears down
> >the inside after time and harms your mouthpiece
> >
> > Amy
> >
> Well, sure, if you are swabing it out with sandpaper!! You do have to be
> careful with the fragile tip, especially if the weight on your swab is bare
> metal, rather than vinyl or cloth-covered. But I have never yet witnessed
> damage caused by swabbing a mouthpiece.
>
> Bill Hausmann bhausman@-----.com
> 451 Old Orchard Drive http://www.concentric.net/~bhausman
> Essexville, MI 48732 http://members.wbs.net/homepages/z/o/o/zoot14.html
>
> If you have to mic a saxophone, the rest of the band is too loud.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 16:01:11 -0400
> From: "Craig E. G. Countryman" <cegc@-----.net>
> Subject: Moss's Nature Studies
>
> Anyone heard of the piece Nature Studies by Lawrence Moss. I'm just
> starting with it and having a bit of difficulty making it all out.
>
> Any advice would be appreciated.
>
> - --
> Craig Countryman
> cegc@-----.net
> http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/1711
>
> Quote of the Day:
>
> "Stop the mindless wishing that things would
> be different. Rather than wasting time and emotional
> and spiritual energy in explaining why we don't have
> what we want, we can start to pursue other ways to get it."
> -Greg Anderson
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 15:59:54 -0400
> From: avrahm galper <agalper@-----.com>
> Subject: Jack Fetherston,a friend
>
> Jack Fetherston (by someone who knew him well)
>
> Jack will always be remembered by those who knew him. He was a "good"
> guy. Always did the right thing. Never did anything out of malice.
> There are always orchestral players who are remembered by some
> idiosyncrasy or other.
> In the Toronto Symphony there was a trombone player, Alfie Wood, who
> always played a sixth in any chord we would play. It was funny.
> There was another player, Harry Bergart, who was also a contractor.
> Whenever the phone rang in the musician's lobby everyone would say "Its
> Harry Bergart"
>
> Even now, Harry having being dead for about 15 years, whenever the
> phone rings at home, and we don't know who might be calling, we say it's
> Harry Bergart!
>
> Jack Fetherston was such a person. Having started out on violin himself,
> (his Father having been a violinist and a player with the Toronto
> Symphony,) Jack would often prelude on certain Bach pieces.
> The violin players were always amused. He did it when they were passing
> by.
> Whenever one of the rotund bass players passed by, he would play "The
> Teddy Bears' picnic".
>
> The other thing that he was noted for was the way he would warm up on a
> clarinet solo and purposely end up with a wrong note.
> One of the bassoon players wrote a medley full of Fetherstonisms which
> was played at an orchestra party
> He was very helpful. During one concert, we were playing the Masquerade
> Suite by Khatchaturian, when suddenly a wave of nausea came over me.
> Jack said to me that I was looking green and I asked him to play the
> cadenza, which he did admirably.
> Having been a pilot during the war on a Lancaster bomber, gave him a lot
> of cool headedness. That was the quick response in the story about the
> mouthpiece cap.
> The story of forgetting the clarinet. That can happen to anyone but we
> were good friends and it was only proper that since he was playing first
> clarinet I would give him the right clarinet at the proper time.
>
> As I said at the outset there are always people who are remembered by
> something they did. His was good things to remember by.
> He was a heavy smoker. Unfortunately, that did him in at the end. No
> ack-ack fire or other planes shooting at his bomber. Lung cancer!
> We'll always remember Jack Fetherston.
>
> Avrahm Galper
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 16:40:06 -0400
> From: Karl Krelove <kkrelove@-----.com>
> Subject: Re: Personal Philosophy of teaching
>
> At 08:19 PM 9/10/97 -0400, you wrote:
> >
> >Hello everyone. My name is Anets and I am a returning member to the list.
> >I have missed about three months of discussion so far. I'd like to take
> >the opportunity to pose a quwstion of my own . I am a recent graduate in
> >Music and am now pursuing a Bachelor of Education Degree ( Teachers Colage)
> >My first assignment of the year has me involved in some deep inner
> >thought, which is somewhat difficult for me.
> >
> > It asks me to state my philosophy of teaching music. Well this may
> >sund easy but for some reason I am having difficulty in getting started.
> >
> >Would anyone like to offer some of their own thoughts on how music should
> >be taught in school, or even at all for that matter. How do you teach
> >music? What do you teach about music? How do you relate to your students?
> >How would you like to relate to your students?
> >
> Far from being an easy question, this is one of the most difficult ones to
> answer and your answer may still be evolving when you reach your
> retirement. I think, though, that the one "question word" you've left out
> of your list is the most important one and the real starting point from
> which to reach answers to the others: you left out "why." "What" and "how"
> only get answered with any conviction when "why" has been answered first.
>
> Good luck.
>
> Karl
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 16:17:41 -0500 (CDT)
> From: Roger Garrett <rgarrett@-----.edu>
> Subject: Re: A Beginner's Question - Cleaning a mouthpiece
>
> I instruct my students not to swab their mouthpieces.....not only does it
> risk scratching the interior, it wears the baffle/tip and gradually
> changes the interior dimensions. John Morgan's method
> is something that should be done once a month or so. A simple rinse in
> lukewarm water is as good a way as any to clean out the mouthpiece weekly.
>
> Roger Garrett
>
> On Sat, 13 Sep 1997, Bill Hausmann wrote:
>
> > At 09:24 PM 9/12/97 -0700, John Morgan wrote:
> > >Michele
> > >
> > >The way I clean my mouthpiece is with a weak solution of vinegar water.
> > >Do not immerse, stand the mouthpiece up in a small glass with the cork
> > >clear of the water. I leave for 20 minutes and swab out gently. The weak
> > >vinegar gets rid of all the deposits and leaves the mouthpiece clean as
> > >new. Hope this helps.
> > >
> > Swab out and wipe off your mouthpiece after each time you use it and this
> > method should seldom be necessary. It should work, though.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of klarinet-digest V1 #249
> ******************************
Please remove me from Your mailings. Thanks lyler31@-----.com

   
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