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Klarinet Archive - Posting 000618.txt from 1996/01

From: Steve Fowler <"Steve Fowler"@-----.COM>
Subj:
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 1996 15:01:41 -0500

> >Could someone tell me why music stores won't sell me synthetic pads to put
> >on my clarinet when they want to put them on themselves. You see, at
> >school, i have the best clarinet, and i don't like any repairman in a music
> >store that does not work on buffet's (or even sell them, in that matter)
> >even TOUCH it. is it just me, or should i let a repairman in a music store
> >work on it?
> >i know how to replace the pads myself!
> >
> >paul Sanchez

Paul,

First off, where did you learn to do a complete repad? Many people can
replace one or two pads without doing much harm because good players
can make up for any small leaks that may occur. But replacing all of
them usually proves difficult. All of those small leaks add up to
long B's not speaking, etc.

Actually, there are several reasons that stores do not like to sell
pads. One is that different makes of instruments require different
sizes of pads, both in width and thickness. Depending on the
manufacturer, these may even change from one instrument to another of
the same model. Also, depending on who worked on your instrument last,
the pads that "should" fit may not because the cups have been
"adjusted" to fit a different pad style than originally installed.

Another problem that exists is if a dealer sells you a product
that doesn't fit your instrument, who is responsible? In your eyes,
and maybe the laws, the dealer is. Dealeres
should know what they are selling. Most music stores have sales people
that know little about which pads are going to fit. Even if the
tech works in the store, he or she rarely have the time it takes to
find the right pads to fit an instrument he is not going to make money
on. The techs get paid to repair. There usually is not a "Parts
Department."

Lastly, and this is the truth in many service industries, repair
people NEED to repair your instrument. It is their livelyhood. It is
what they do to put bread on the table and kids through college. The
profit is not in parts, it is all labor. It is what they do with their
lives to make a difference. Many of us don't want to lose that.

Good luck.

Steve

Steve Fowler (sfowler@-----.com)

   
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